IB Students Present Exhibitions

Courtesy: Kelli Gile
Groups research topics of their choice based on modern-day issues including climate change, poverty, GMOs, and cyber bullying for the year-end IB Exhibitions.

By Kelli Gile 

WALNUT Castle Rock and Cyrus J. Morris Elementary 5th grade students present collaborative inquiry-based research projects during the culminating weeks of their K-5 learning experience.

 

Students use IB skills, attitudes, and attributes acquired through the elite Primary Years Programme.

 

Groups research topics of their choice based on modern-day issues including climate change, poverty, GMOs, and cyber bullying for the year-end IB Exhibitions.

 

For the past three months, groups worked on exhibition projects with the support of mentor volunteer teachers.

 

Each plan was well-researched and thoughtfully prepared as the students took turns publicly sharing results at the microphone while incorporating the use of visual displays, posters, and multimedia presentations.

 

A six-person team at Castle Rock took on the impact that cell phones make on society and presented their findings in the comprehensive report for attentive parents and family members.

 

The group’s lines of inquiry included effects on people, effects on society, different types of usage, and effect on ecosystem.

 

Cell phones effect the ways people communicate with each other and types of usage include banking, job searches, maps, online shopping, social media, and more, the poised hosts explained.

 

“Cell phones can help people find jobs and connect with the world,” said Emily Zhao.

 

The students also presented a video survey of schoolmates and staff along with tips to reduce radiation exposure during usage during the May 24 exhibition.

 

“Try to keep phones at least an inch away from the neck or use Bluetooth,” suggested Fang Hong Foo.

 

For the project’s action plan, the team posted “Cell Phone Free Zone” signs along the school drop-off zone.

 

“We’re hoping parents will stay off their phones!” said Angel Wei.

 

“Texting and driving increases the chance of traffic incidents,” added Michael Wu.

 

A group of C.J. Morris students worked hard investigating the effects of terrorism for their exhibition project.

 

“There’s been so much damage around the world,” commented Marcos Davaloz.

 

The children fielded questions from parents after the May 17 presentation.

 

“We can enhance security to make it harder to smuggle in bombs,” said Diego Suviate responding to an inquiry about methods to stop the attacks.

 

For the culminating action plan, students sold water and fruit drinks for a dollar during recess.

 

“We decided to donate to the Washington Institute which helps end terrorism around the world,” explained Audrey Chavarin proudly reporting the team collected over $22.

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