Tag Archives: Vantage Point Church

Curing Your Holiday Heart Condition

BY PASTOR MARK LEE

Whether it is the tale of a boy and a BB gun, the account of an old man haunted by ghosts, or the story of an overgrown elf searching for his parents, Christmas movies are one of the most anticipated aspects of the holidays. And, of the hundreds of films created to celebrate the season, one always tops the list of favorites: How the Grinch Stole Christmas. The saga of a green guy with a heart “two sizes too small” strikes a chord with audiences – and for good reason.

While some refer to December as the “most wonderful time of the year,” there are many people who would disagree. From relationship problems and financial woes to work responsibilities and time constraints, everyday life is difficult enough. Add in the demands of the holiday season, and you have a recipe for disaster. In fact, studies reveal that depression, anxiety, and stress all peak at Christmastime. Therefore, it is no surprise that many can relate to the Grinch’s heart condition.

One of the reasons our hearts aren’t quite what they should be during the holidays is because of unresolved issues. Owning up to your problems is the first step toward healing. Asking for, or granting, forgiveness is also important. The process of curing what ails you may be painful, terrifying, and unpleasant, but the results are extraordinary.

Proverbs 27:19 says, “As a face is reflected in water, so the heart reflects the person.” The way you view Christmas has nothing to do with the hustle and bustle of the holidays, and everything to do with the state of your heart. By taking the proper steps, you can ensure that the reason for the season will shine through!

VantagePoint Church meets at Roosevelt High School on Sundays at 8:30, 10, and 11:30 a.m.

 

 

 

Hungering For More Than Pumpkin Pie

BY PASTOR MARK LEE

Pastor Mark Lee Vantage Point Church

Pastor Mark Lee of Vantage Point Church in Eastvale

Approximately 675 million pounds of turkey, 50 million pumpkin pies, and 40 million green bean casseroles will be consumed this month. In total, the average American is expected to consume at least 3,000 calories on Thanksgiving Day. And yet, when each person wakes up the next morning, they will most likely eat breakfast. Why? Because hunger is not a one-time need. It is something that needs to be satisfied daily.

Everyone has experienced the craving for food. However, our physical appetites are not the only desires we seek to fulfill. Throughout society, we see examples of people who hunger for everything from power and fame to money, beauty, and success. Even in our own households we experience a thirst for more; more possessions, more status, or simply more time. But what if the things of this world still don’t seem to satisfy your hunger? What if it is actually the nonphysical world that you seek?

The quest for spiritual fulfillment manifests itself in a variety of ways. Some people attempt to achieve moral perfection through service. Others believe that knowledge or justice is the answer. While all of these things are definitely positive, real righteousness comes from the dependence on a higher power. Much like you can’t tempt a starving man with anything but food, the hunger for righteousness can only be satisfied by God.

Spiritual fulfillment is a lifetime pursuit that involves discipline and sacrifice. It means daily dying to self. But, the encouraging news is that God doesn’t just sanctify the righteousness, he sanctifies the hunger. Matthew 5:6 says, “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness.” You see, it isn’t only about the destination. The journey is just as important.

VantagePoint Church meets at Roosevelt High School on Sundays at 8:30, 10, and 11:30 a.m.

 

 

 

 

The Summer Of Love

BY PASTOR MARK LEE

Pastor Mark Lee Vantage Point Church

Pastor Mark Lee of Vantage Point Church in Eastvale

During the warm months of 1967, thousands of people from across the United States converged upon the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco as part of a hippie counterculture movement that became known as, “The Summer of Love.”

47 years later, VantagePoint Church created its own version of the Summer of Love. The goal of the campaign was simple: To be living proof of a loving God. From giving away water, coffee, and Redbox rentals to hosting a football and cheerleading camp, church members were committed to serving the residents of Eastvale.

One of the many benefits of this special campaign was that it helped promote the importance of community. Researchers have repeatedly found that people with strong social connections have happier lives, less stress-related health problems, lower risk of mental illness, and faster recovery from trauma or illness.

So, how do you foster a greater sense of connectedness? The answer is twofold. First, you need to be real. While we often feel the need to present a perfect image to the outside world, the truth is that you can only be loved to the extent you are known. In joining our lives with others, we also need to be accepting. Realness doesn’t happen without acceptance. After all, who wants to open themselves up if they know they will get hurt?

Psalms 133:1 says, “How good and pleasant it is when God’s people live together in unity.” There is power in community. Whether you get to know your neighbor, become involved in your city, or simply open your heart to another person, you will be blessed.

 

VantagePoint Church meets at Roosevelt High School on Sundays at 8:30, 10, and 11:30 a.m.

Eastvale: March Madness

Pastor Mark Lee Vantage Point Church

Pastor Mark Lee of Vantage Point Church in Easvale

BY PASTOR MARK LEE

For sports fans, March is a month known for madness. During the exciting final weeks of the college basketball season, teams across the country battle for the national championship. This rapid succession of single elimination games is commonly referred to as “March Madness.” However, anyone who has ever driven a Southern California freeway can tell you that madness is not exclusively reserved for the month of March.

According to the 2008 Mental Health Organization report entitled “Boiling Point,” 32 percent of people say they have a close friend of family member who has trouble controlling their anger. At the same time, more than one out of every four people admits to occasionally worrying about their own anger.

The unfortunate truth is that we live in the age of rage. This becomes exceedingly evident during a trip to any sporting event, shopping mall, or elementary school parking lot. People are angry. But, this doesn’t always have to be a bad thing. Anger, if channeled properly, can be a source of motivation.

Anger can encourage you to work harder, persevere longer, and move faster. It can also result in significant change. After all, it was anger that led to the American Revolution and the Civil Rights Movement. It is anger that drives us to find cures, enact social reform, and make a difference in the world.

Ephesians 4:26-27 says “In your anger, do not sin. Do not let the sun go down while you are still angry, and do not give the devil a foothold.” The Bible does not condemn anger. Instead, it advises us to control our behavior when we are angry. It is okay to get mad, but it is not okay to act bad.

VantagePoint Church meets at Roosevelt High School on Sundays at 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m., and 11:30 a.m.