Prior Chino Hills City Hall Being Bought Out By Private Owner

By Marissa Mitchell

 

Chino Hills – On April 4, the Chino Hills Planning Commission met to discuss the plan that private owner Trumark Homes is requesting approval of for the area over which previously stood Chino Hills City Hall.

Due to various issues with municipal code and site plan reviews, the hearing was continued to April 18, and the report from that review meeting is still being drafted.

What is termed as the “Founders Village Project” because it is located on Founders Drive has been beset with various issues. Previously the location of Chino Hills Civic Center, with the new purchase, the sloped areas of the property would be designated as “private open space” and the flat area of the property would be classified as “medium density residential.”

Discussed at this planning meeting was the adoption a Municipal Code Amendment, which would exempt developments consisting only of duplex housing units from the obligatory building separation standards for multi-family developments in Chino Hills Municipal Code (CHMC).

There would be 38 duplexes consisting of 76 dwelling units in this former municipally-owned area. These proposed 76 units would range from 2,442 sq. ft. to 2,569 sq. ft, each unit possessing five (5) bedrooms, a two-car garage, and a minimum of 525 square feet of private open space (such as backyard space).

Senior Planner Ryan Gackstetter presented the information on this project to the Planning Commission on April 4. The project applications include a General Plan Amendment, Zone Change, Municipal Code Amendment, Site Plan Review, and Vesting Tentative Tract Map. Overall, it would help the city reach housing and population goals.

One public speaker and resident of the adjacent neighborhood on Deer Haven Drive, Antonio Tau, voiced concerns about parking. He stated that the on-street parking within the project may be insufficient, and so residents and guests would park on surrounding streets, such as his own. He suggested prohibitions to overnight parking or required permits as a solution to this potential problem. This concern played a part in the continuation of the hearing until April 18.

The senior planner Gackstetter stated of the proposed alterations and concerns, and the private application overall, “The applicant is making concerted efforts and strides toward adaptation to code and paying heed to surrounding citizens’ concerns.”

A few of the issues the Commission discussed with both staff and applicant included the following: street improvements and project requirements to ensure driver visibility entering and exiting Founders Drive; guest parking on the driveways of the duplex units with fewer on-street parking; landscaping, irrigation, and maintenance of project perimeter slopes; project design, the connection of the duplex units, and the quality of the architecture, among others.

After the application is brought to the commission, it will be brought before the City Council Citizens of Chino Hills will soon see just what their “old” city hall becomes, and who that land houses.