Tag Archives: Clark’s Nutrition

The Iron Compliant

By C Doussett MPH, RDN

Clark’s Nutrition

Iron has long been used as a therapy for weakness throughout history, even when the purveyors of this remedy knew nothing of its ability to mitigate weakness or lethargy. Hippocrates, the father of medicine, would recommend ferruginous (rich in iron) water treatments to individuals suffering from what was termed “chlorosis” or iron-deficiency anemia. It made sense to the Greeks that a condition of weakness (anemia) should be met with an element of strength (iron). The god of war, Ares, was associated with the element iron as it was the chief component in his spear (bronze-tipped) and shield, and was a symbol of strength. Yet aside from mythology, iron as a real cause and therefore treatment of lethargy, weakness, and a slew of other symptoms is well understood today and is one of the most researched and well-understood elements in the human diet.

Iron is important for metabolism (energy production), affects many hormones, such as thyroid hormone and testosterone, and is crucial for growth and normal development throughout life. While isolated iron deficiency is fairly uncommon in the US, infants, teenage girls, pregnant and lactating mothers, postmenopausal women, and those with poor diets are at a heightened risk. It is important to receive regular checkups and comply with doctor orders if diagnosed as deficient or anemic. Iron requirements change as we age and range from 8 milligrams (mgs) to 18 mgs and goes as high as 27 milligrams in pregnant and lactating women

Iron deficiency is commonly observed as anemia which may have some of the following symptoms:

  1. Weakness, feelings of coldness
  2. Decreased work and school performance
  3. Slow cognitive or social development
  4. Decreased immune function.

In nature, iron may be found bound to “heme” or without heme. Heme is a nitrogen-based cyclical structure that is a part of hemoglobin found in red blood cells, and myoglobin found in muscles that carry the oxygen we breathe to cells and carbon dioxide away from cells. Heme iron (found in animal foods) and nonheme iron (plant-based) may be absorbed differently and will certainly be found in different concentrations depending on the makeup of one’s diet. .

Iron from animal sources may be absorbed up to 35% and iron from plant sources may be 20% absorbed, yet this does not mean a non-meat eater needs to consume meat sources of iron. Iron needs in the body are closely regulated and our ability to absorb iron is based on our need to absorb iron. If we are deficient in iron, our body will absorb more in the gastrointestinal tract and if we are “topped” off in our tissues, we will absorb less. Therefore, iron absorption is more an issue of need than an actual issue of source.

The majority of iron supplements are the non-heme variety and absorption is increased when eaten with foods high in vitamin C such as orange juice, bell peppers, broccoli, and strawberries or with a vitamin C supplement (100-250 mgs). It should come as no surprise that the majority of iron consumption in the US comes from breads and grain-based desserts. Here are some excellent iron sources for anyone to include:

Heme (animal) iron sources

  1. Liver, beef, & chicken
  2. Clams & oysters
  3. Salmon & tuna,

Non heme (plant) iron sources

  1. Lentils & beans
  2. Spinach & pumpkin seeds
  3. Fortified cereals and grains

We have an evolved ability in today’s day and age to be diagnosed and remedy many things that afflict us. Luckily, iron deficiency is no longer viewed as a person’s lack of war-like aggression and treated with Ares’ spear. If you have been diagnosed with iron deficiency and given the go-ahead to seek out iron rich foods or supplements, speak to a nutritional consultant today and explore your iron needs. As always, have a healthy day!

 

Optimus Prime

By Craig “Deuce” Doussett MPH, RDN, Clark’s Nutrition

The vast majority of us want cut-and-dried answers. We want to know what the best supplements are, how much sleep to get, the right amount of water to drink, the best foods to consume in their proper ratios and times, and the most effective exercises and peak times to perform them. We desire to know the “best” (optimum) and “first in order” (prime) information to make our lives productive, rewarding, and free from distracting demands. In this spirit, here are a few answers that are steeped in science.

  1. Water is fairly easy, drink when thirsty and avoid darkly colored urine. While overhydration is not as common as dehydration, it can be just as dangerous, so drink plenty of water and always plan ahead. Stock up on water and have plenty of stainless steel or glass water containers on hand. As for food, Michael Pollan succinctly stated, “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants”. It does not matter what food camp we align with if the above dictum is ignored. One caveat, protein should be at every meal, carbs early in the day or after training, and fats in the afternoon. Protein powders can be excellent additions to busy lifestyles seeking simplified and salubrious solutions.
  2. Sleep seven to nine hours a night! In most individuals, less or more than this amount may result in overeating (non-homeostatic appetite), a decrease in resting metabolic rate, and hyperglycemia (high blood sugar [glucose]). All of the aforementioned conditions lead to weight gain and compromised immune systems. Experiment with natural and safe sleep aids such as melatonin (inform your physician), magnesium (with added L-Threonine to access neural tissue more effectively), and herbal teas such as valerian, chamomile, or hops.
  3. Exercise? A combination of cardiovascular exercise (running, swimming, biking etc.), resistance training (busting the weights), and high intensity interval training (HIIT), (start/stop movements cycled through power intervals) is best. Cardio is not only for heart health, it provides our brains with an influx of oxygen and nutrients, further increasing our odds of staving off forms of dementia and depression. Resistance training three time weekly (for skeletal and mitochondrial biogenesis) prepares the body for the demands of both daily and future life. Lastly, HIIT (flexibility, and lymphatic fluid movement) is an excellent way to challenge oneself and experience fat-burning and toning benefits simultaneously.
  4. When to work out? The short answer is whenever you enjoy it the most and will make it a lasting habit. The science shows, all things being equal, the afternoon is the best time. Firstly, in the afternoon our skeletal muscle is naturally less sensitive to insulin and exercise sensitizes our body to accept glucose and clear blood sugar before it moves to fat tissue to be repartitioned. Thus, afternoon exercise can help avoid a phenomenon known as “Afternoon diabetes”. Better sugar control means muscles perform better and longer. Secondly, while testosterone is higher in the morning, so is cortisol which is a hormone that can have delimitating effects on training adaptation. In the afternoon, the testosterone to cortisol ratio is improved (it is lower). Thirdly, we must consider our core temperature which is optimum in the afternoon for both genetic expression and mitochondrial output. Working out in the cold of morning means brains, muscles, cells, and bodily fluids are all at their slowest. Spoiler alert: there is a reason world records get broken in the afternoon.

Sometimes, it is best, in the face of undecided science, to follow the example of a certain brightly colored, anthropomorphized semi-truck and simply “Roll Out”! We do the best we can with the data we have until our choices are sufficiently challenged or our goals change. Ask a nutritional consultant to assist you in making your individualized approach to a healthy lifestyle.

 

Clark’s Nutrition

By Staff Reports

Chino- When my daughter was little, we would take her to Chuck E. Cheese every year for her birthday. Then one year I announced that rather than going to Chuck E. Cheese, we would take her to Disneyland for her very first time. She was upset and disappointed. All she had ever known was this small local pizza place ran by Chuck E., so she had no idea what was waiting for her at the “happiest place on earth.” Needless to say when she walked through the front gate at Disneyland, she “got it.” Disneyland was bigger, better, and more amazing.
I recently visited Clark’s Nutrition in Chino for the first time. It is the Disneyland of natural foods stores! For years I settled with what I knew from other stores, but after walking through the front door of Clark’s, I “got it!” Clark’s is not just bigger and better, but its one of the most amazing natural foods store I’ve ever been in.
What’s a Clarks store like? Imagine if you morphed Sprouts, Whole Foods, GNC, and Trader Joes into one store. It would be called Clarks! Clark’s has the largest selection of organic produce, supplements, and natural foods in the Inland Empire. They also have a great bulk foods section, they have grass-fed meats, a full dairy section, and the Chino location even has a juice bar! Clark’s was recently featured on a bus tour that brought other natural foods grocers from all over the world to visit Clarks in Chino. Clark’s has been told they have the largest supplement section in the United States in their Chino location. Basically, if you are looking for it, they’ve got it! I’ve also noticed that Clark’s prices are reasonable on most everything. I was surprised at the pricing since they had so much selection, I thought I would be paying for it; yet another pleasant surprise.
If that isn’t enough to get you into Clarks, they have Nutritional Consultants to help you. These Nutritional Consultants really know a lot about nutrition. Just look for the employees in the maroon shirts. They’re the Nutritional Consultants. Kyle and Joe are a couple of my favorites, but they’re all great. Clark’s has a 5-level training program that takes these Nutritional Consultants about 3 ½ years to complete. This sets them apart from everyone. Starkie Sowers, Clark’s Director of Education writes and teaches these in-house classes. Starkie says, “From the beginning, we knew we wanted to really help people educate themselves about their own health.” No one at Clarks is on commission. Starkie adds, “I’ve been with Clarks for 36 years and although the natural foods industry has grown and changed a great deal, the Clark family have always been committed to providing solid answers for customers trying to navigate their unique heath goals.” Clark’s attracts a wide variety of customers; people with food allergens, those wanting to get/remain fit, moms trying to help their family eat healthier, customers seeking holistic approaches to health and wellness, Vegans, Vegetarians…and the list goes on. Marketing Director, Mike Barnett says, “People are looking for a trusted source for their nutrition questions and Clark’s knowledgeable Nutritional Consultants are the final stop for people looking for real help.”
As a lifelong resident in the Inland Empire, I had heard of Clarks, but didn’t know where their locations are and that they’ve been around since 1972. Clarks’ is family owned and operated. It makes me feel good knowing that I am supporting a small local business rather helping shareholders make more money. All four of Clark’s locations are local: Chino, Riverside, Loma Linda, and Rancho Mirage. I am glad to finally count myself among those that “get it!” My family and I can be found at Clarks in Chino. Discover Clark’s Nutrition and stop settling for less. ■

What Baboons Can Teach Us About Stress

By Clark’s Nutrition, C Doussett MPH, RDN

Stanford neurobiologist Robert Sapolski has spent the last 35 years studying baboons and the effects of stress in social situations. Throughout this time, he has observed some remarkable phenomena among these ‘Old World’ monkeys that may offer valuable insights into the myriad ways social hierarchies affect our health and chances for a longer life. The social hierarchy of baboons is similar to the hierarchical structures we find ourselves in at work, school, and home and may encourage us to rethink how we deal and choose to be with others. Two noteworthy phenomena observed by Dr. Sapolski centered on the effects of stress up and down the social hierarchy. Almost without fail, the lower a baboon was on the social chain, the more health problems it suffered; specifically, cardiovascular disease (atherosclerosis in particular), increased frequency of injury, and more time spent foraging foods for others rather than taking care of itself. The second observation was that baboons that happened to live in troops where all members were seen as equals, had less incidence of injury, degenerative disease, and domination cycles. This is congruent with professional viewpoints regarding healthy relationships both intimate and familiar for humans. Choosing groups that view every member as an equal and indoctrinating new members to this way of thinking is critical in avoiding unhealthy and potentially injurious power dynamics. Here are a few behaviors to strive for:

  • Always ‘fight fair’ in your group – respecting a partner’s/friend’s rights means accepting differences in background and opinion
  • Listen and clarify – focus on the intent of the speaker, don’t interrupt, and repeat the message if needed in your own words
  • Find your voice – speak your truth as clearly and succinctly as possible
  • Edit your voice – Choose your words as you would choose any tool for the task at hand i.e., not every job requires a hammer
  • Your wants and needs should support the groups wants and needs, otherwise, find a new group/friend

Now that we have found our group, it behooves us to support our body’s wants and needs. Treating our bodies like our best friend is one way to send the message that we only accept respectful friend requests. The following foods and supplements may further our efforts to manage stress and support healthy relationships:

  • Nuts – a cholesterol free snack that may reduce inflammation
  • Salmon – healthy omega 3s for brain health
  • Avocadoes – potassium = great for blood pressure
  • Dark chocolate – ‘feel-good’ compounds such as caffeine and theobromine
  • Crunchy vegetables: celery, broccoli, and carrot sticks require mechanical digestion (chewing) which may directly reduce ‘clenched-jaw tension’
  • Water – a hydrated system is a fully functioning system
  • Passion flower – discovered in Peru 500 years ago and still a great option in tea or tincture form for anxiety
  • Gingko Biloba – circulation to the brain
  • Vitamin C – reduces circulating cortisol (stress hormone) levels, especially when taken before or immediately after a stressful event. 500 mgs
  • Physical activity – monkeys, when not moving as a troop, spend time playing, grooming, and engaging in short-bursts of activity throughout the day. This is not too far off the recommended daily “types” of activity for humans

There is no monkey business when it comes to building healthy relationships and reducing distress to our life. Seek out a qualified nutritional consultant and discuss personalized options for achieving or maintaining positive-stress relationships. And, as always, have a healthy day!

 

 

 

You’re Either Going To Clark’s, Or You’re Settling For Less…Way Less

Experience Clark’s great customer service, knowledgeable staff, and affordable pricing. Visit http://www.clarksnutrition.com.

By Staff Reports

 

Chino– When my daughter was little, we would take her to Chuck E. Cheese every year for her birthday. Then one year I announced that rather than going to Chuck E. Cheese, we would take her to Disneyland for her very first time. She was upset and disappointed. All she had ever known was this small local pizza place ran by Chuck E., so she had no idea what was waiting for her at the “happiest place on earth.”  Needless to say when she walked through the front gate at Disneyland, she “got it.”  Disneyland was bigger, better, and more amazing.

I recently visited Clark’s Nutrition in Chino for the first time. It is the Disneyland of natural foods stores! For years I settled with what I knew from other stores, but after walking through the front door of Clark’s, I “got it!” Clark’s is not just bigger and better, but its one of the most amazing natural foods store I’ve ever been in.

What’s a Clarks store like? Imagine if you morphed Sprouts, Whole Foods, GNC, and Trader Joes into one store. It would be called Clarks! Clark’s has the largest selection of organic produce, supplements, and natural foods in the Inland Empire. They also have a great bulk foods section, they have grass-fed meats, a full dairy section, and the Chino location even has a juice bar! Clark’s was recently featured on a bus tour that brought other natural foods grocers from all over the world to visit Clarks in Chino.  Clark’s has been told they have the largest supplement section in the United States in their Chino location. Basically, if you are looking for it, they’ve got it! I’ve also noticed that Clark’s prices are reasonable on most everything. I was surprised at the pricing since they had so much selection, I thought I would be paying for it; yet another pleasant surprise.

If that isn’t enough to get you into Clarks, they have Nutritional Consultants to help you. These Nutritional Consultants really know a lot about nutrition. Just look for the employees in the maroon shirts. They’re the Nutritional Consultants. Kyle and Joe are a couple of my favorites, but they’re all great. Clark’s has a 5-level training program that takes these Nutritional Consultants about 3 ½ years to complete. This sets them apart from everyone. Starkie Sowers, Clark’s Director of Education writes and teaches these in-house classes. Starkie says, “From the beginning, we knew we wanted to really help people educate themselves about their own health.” No one at Clarks is on commission. Starkie adds, “I’ve been with Clarks for 36 years and although the natural foods industry has grown and changed a great deal, the Clark family have always been committed to providing solid answers for customers trying to navigate their unique heath goals.” Clark’s attracts a wide variety of customers; people with food allergens, those wanting to get/remain fit, moms trying to help their family eat healthier, customers seeking holistic approaches to health and wellness, Vegans, Vegetarians…and the list goes on. Marketing Director, Mike Barnett says, “People are looking for a trusted source for their nutrition questions and Clark’s knowledgeable Nutritional Consultants are the final stop for people looking for real help.”

As a lifelong resident in the Inland Empire, I had heard of Clarks, but didn’t know where their locations are and that they’ve been around since 1972. Clarks’ is family owned and operated. It makes me feel good knowing that I am supporting a small local business rather helping shareholders make more money. All four of Clark’s locations are local: Chino, Riverside, Loma Linda, and Rancho Mirage. I am glad to finally count myself among those that “get it!” My family and I can be found at Clarks in Chino. Discover Clark’s Nutrition and stop settling for less.

Chino’s Hidden Treasure: Clark’s Nutrition

Staff Reports

Clark’s is open 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day. Stop by for yourselves and experience Clark’s great customer service, knowledgeable staff, and affordable pricing. Visit www.clarksnutrition.com.

Clark’s is open 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day. Stop by for yourselves and experience Clark’s great customer service, knowledgeable staff, and affordable pricing. Visit http://www.clarksnutrition.com.

Chino – Have you ever heard of Clark’s Nutrition? Imagine a Whole Foods, Sprouts, Trader Joes, and Nutrishop all under one roof… in your back yard, Chino! Clark’s Nutrition & Natural Foods Market is a rare find in the natural foods industry. If you haven’t discovered this amazing store yet, it is worth your time to investigate.

Marketing Director, Mike Barnett says, “Often people will tell us that they’ve heard of Clarks and they think it’s just another supplement shop, but once they walk inside our Chino store, they get what all the fuss is about.”

Clark’s stores not only have a huge selection of supplements (their Chino location has one of the largest supplement sections in the entire country), but they have a wide variety of organic grocery items, complete with gluten-free sections,  including Vegan and Vegetarian options, as well as a large selection of organic produce.

Want to get a free make-over with natural, cruelty-free make-up too? No problem, Clark’s has a make-up section that looks like something you’d see at a MAC make-up counter. Clark’s is the only retail partner with actress, Suzanne Somers, to offer her organic cosmetics and skin care line, SUZANNE Organics.

Clark’s is a pioneer in the health food world. They opened the doors of their first location in Riverside in 1972, long before health food became vogue. Today there are stores in Riverside, Loma Linda, Rancho Mirage and now Chino.

But have you ever been to a “health foods” store before and felt overwhelmed or weren’t sure where to start? Have you felt the opposite, like you knew more than the employee? Have no fear, Clark’s knows how refreshing it is to speak with health food store employees that know their stuff and are willing to share their knowledge.

The Clark’s slogan is, “Live better, we can help.”  How does Clark’s actually help people you ask? Clark’s has made their business thrive on helping to educate people about their health. Starkie Sowers, the Director of Education at Clarks says, “We have Nutritional Consultants at Clarks. These employees go through our 5 level in-house training program. It takes about 3 ½ years to get to a Level 5 at Clarks.” Clark’s takes education about health seriously. These knowledgeable (non-commission) Nutritional Consultants are one of the keys to why people love Clarks so much.

Clark’s is a great find for anyone looking to improve their health. They have competitive pricing, knowledgeable staff, a great product selection and a beautiful Chino location close to home.

Discover this Chino treasure located at 12835 Mountain Ave in Chino.

Ask Clark’s

“I have heard a lot about Turmeric. What is Turmeric and why is it so popular?”  – A question from an anonymous reader 

By Clark’s Nutrition "ask clarks" header

Turmeric (botanical name: Curcuma longa) is a member of the ginger family. In fact if you look at fresh turmeric in the stores it resembles the look of ginger but with a deep yellow-orange color to it. Turmeric is grown in India, China, Indonesia and other tropical countries and has been a cultivated product since 3000B.C. Most Turmeric is cured, boiled, cleaned, sun-dried and then ground up into a powder form.

Turmeric is one of the major ingredients found in curry and is used as a food color in many other products.  Turmeric is also a venerated herb of the Ayurvedic pharmacopeia.  Turmeric is used in the Ayurvedic and Chinese systems of medicine to help fight inflammation, flatulence and menstrual difficulties to name a few. Current popularity has centered on the anti-inflammatory benefits. Turmeric’s ability to have anti-inflammatory possibilities surrounds the yellow pigment called curcumanoid. Many scientific studies have compared curcumin to over the counter and prescription anti-inflammatory substances.

A few of the issues that came out these studies were that the use of Turmeric could improve the ability to fight morning stiffness, help increase walking times and reduce joint swelling and that Turmeric was comparable to ibuprofen (400mg of extracted turmeric to 400mg of ibuprofen). Curcumin’s also having a powerful anti-oxidant effect protecting the body from free radicals. There have been numerous studies with Turmeric and cancer cells in test tube situations. Promising results of the test-tube research has encouraged more human clinical studies and research on this subject.

Please remember that using Turmeric is not a cure for cancer. Many companies that process Turmeric products often will indicate the amount or percentage of curcumanoid’s and may indicate a better process to increase the absorption with their products. So this will cause a little confusion when looking to a product of choice. Spend time reading labels while making an informed choice on a capsule of extracted product. One last note; Turmeric can and will stain clothes, tables, rugs, etc so don’t spill it on the floor or forget capsules in pockets before washing.

 

References:

  1. A novelcurcumin derivative which inhibits P-glycoprotein, arrests cell cycle and induces apoptosis in multidrug resistance cells.Lopes-Rodrigues V, Oliveira A, Correia-da-Silva M, Pinto M, Lima RT, Sousa E, Vasconcelos MH.Bioorg Med Chem. 2016 Nov 19. pii: S0968-0896(16)31189-0. doi: 10.1016/j.bmc.2016.11.023. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27908756
  2. Curcuminsuppresses colon cancer cell invasion via AMPK-induced inhibition of NF-κB, uPA activator and MMP9.Tong W, Wang Q, Sun D, Suo J.Oncol Lett. 2016 Nov;12(5):4139-4146.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27895783
  3. Cucurmin; Anticancer and Antitumor Perspectives – A Comprehensive Review.Imran M, Saeed F, Nadeem M, Arshad MU, Ullah A, Suleria HA.Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2016 Nov 22:0. [Epub ahead of print]PMID:27874279https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27874279
  4. Curcumalonga extract reduces inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers in osteoarthritis of knee: a four-month, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.Srivastava S, Saksena AK, Khattri S, Kumar S, Dagur RS.Inflammopharmacology. 2016 Dec;24(6):377-388.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27761693
  5. Murray N.D., Healing with Foods, Atria Books New York NY. 2005. Pg 521-4.

 

Clark’s Nutrition Health Tip

Clark’s Tips Clarks-Header-WEB

The Meta-Diet!

By Clark’s Nutrition

The search to find a “one-size-fits-all” approach to nutrition and health has led to the proliferation of diets and eating philosophies. Some diets exclude certain combined macronutrients at certain times of the day, while others originate from certain regions or exotic locales and tout themselves as nutritional panaceas. It would be impossible (and inarguably unhealthy) to try them all, which leaves us with the dieters dilemma; how to find a diet that is right for us and will not only increase our quality of life, but the quantity as well. If history is our guide, then we know the best hope for a quick fix is slow science.

To this end, researchers from Stanford University conducted the “A to Z Weight-Loss Study”, which compared diets ranging from the Atkins (A) Diet (along with the Ornish and LEARN diet), to The Zone (Z) Diet. The researchers assigned 311 nondiabetic women to one of the four diets, with weight loss at 12 months as the primary outcome. It must be noted that one caveat to all diet-related research is the issue of compliance, or lack thereof, as the number one reason why diets tend to fail over time. People resort to their old eating style and this variance, inevitably, confounds the data. However, in this study the participants adhered very well to their diets and shockingly, for some, the Atkins Diet outperformed the other three in weight loss (primary outcome) and had mildly significant advantages for lowered blood pressure and blood fats. Does this mean the Atkins Diet is the right one for everybody? Certainly not, yet the methodology used in this study does demonstrate that if weight loss, lowered blood pressure and triglycerides are the goal, this diet could serve those outcomes moderately well.

Where does that leave us in our quest for a sustainable and personalized diet? Is a convergence of agreement our best hope, coupled with ongoing modification and a judicious dose of trial-and-error? Yes, every healthy and sustainable diet (married to exercise) have these foods in common, fruits, fatty fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, and seeds with different (well-tolerated) sources of meats, eggs, and dairy added in if desired. It should be noted that dairy, animal proteins, and grains are one area where people make decisions for more reasons than weight loss and this should be respected and explored. One admonition for exercise needs elucidating, while it is a vital component in the quest for a prolonged health span, it cannot overcome the phenomenon of non-homeostatic eating (eating beyond satiety signals and bodily requirements). This may have led Dr.s Phinney and Volek to declare in their book, “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living”, ‘exercise is great for wellbeing but poor for weight loss’. This concept is aptly embodied in the adage, “You can’t outrun a bad diet”.

Ultimately, recommending a diet is easy to do but ensuring the diet is the correct approach requires much more finesse. Without the proper blood work (medical involvement), family history (repeated interviews), assessment of health literacy (objective tests), ability to shop, prepare, serve, preserve, and store foods (skills mastery), and a good dose of behavior modification techniques, then the recommendation is incorrectly administered. Speak to a nutritional consultant today and start your informed journey to maximizing your health span, and beyond.

C Doussett MPH, RDN

 

Chino’s Hidden Treasure: Clark’s Nutrition

Staff Reports

Clark’s is open 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day. Stop by for yourselves and experience Clark’s great customer service, knowledgeable staff, and affordable pricing. Visit www.clarksnutrition.com.

Clark’s is open 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day. Stop by for yourselves and experience Clark’s great customer service, knowledgeable staff, and affordable pricing. Visit http://www.clarksnutrition.com.

Chino – Have you ever heard of Clark’s Nutrition? Imagine a Whole Foods, Sprouts, Trader Joes, and Nutrishop all under one roof… in your back yard, Chino! Clark’s Nutrition & Natural Foods Market is a rare find in the natural foods industry. If you haven’t discovered this amazing store yet, it is worth your time to investigate.

Marketing Director, Mike Barnett says, “Often people will tell us that they’ve heard of Clarks and they think it’s just another supplement shop, but once they walk inside our Chino store, they get what all the fuss is about.”

Clark’s stores not only have a huge selection of supplements (their Chino location has one of the largest supplement sections in the entire country), but they have a wide variety of organic grocery items, complete with gluten-free sections,  including Vegan and Vegetarian options, as well as a large selection of organic produce.

Want to get a free make-over with natural, cruelty-free make-up too? No problem, Clark’s has a make-up section that looks like something you’d see at a MAC make-up counter. Clark’s is the only retail partner with actress, Suzanne Somers, to offer her organic cosmetics and skin care line, SUZANNE Organics.

Clark’s is a pioneer in the health food world. They opened the doors of their first location in Riverside in 1972, long before health food became vogue. Today there are stores in Riverside, Loma Linda, Rancho Mirage and now Chino.

But have you ever been to a “health foods” store before and felt overwhelmed or weren’t sure where to start? Have you felt the opposite, like you knew more than the employee? Have no fear, Clark’s knows how refreshing it is to speak with health food store employees that know their stuff and are willing to share their knowledge.

The Clark’s slogan is, “Live better, we can help.”  How does Clark’s actually help people you ask? Clark’s has made their business thrive on helping to educate people about their health. Starkie Sowers, the Director of Education at Clarks says, “We have Nutritional Consultants at Clarks. These employees go through our 5 level in-house training program. It takes about 3 ½ years to get to a Level 5 at Clarks.” Clark’s takes education about health seriously. These knowledgeable (non-commission) Nutritional Consultants are one of the keys to why people love Clarks so much.

Clark’s is a great find for anyone looking to improve their health. They have competitive pricing, knowledgeable staff, a great product selection and a beautiful Chino location close to home.

Discover this Chino treasure located at 12835 Mountain Ave in Chino.

Clark’s Tips

Magnesium the Magnificent!

By Clark’s Nutrition  Clarks Header-CMYK

Medieval Latin named it “magnesia”, a white lodestone mineral that was highly magnetic and very highly prized by the 15th century alchemists. This group of protoscientists aimed to purify base metals into gold and craft elixirs of mortality, and believed magnesium deposits could be used to craft the mythical “philosopher’s stone”. While unsuccessful in their pursuit, this historically significant movement produced many writings that would eventually be of benefit to geologists, architects, physiologists and biochemists. Today, we know magnesium to be one of the most important, most studied, and most dynamic nutrients in our bodies. As a major mineral, magnesium assists the body in carrying out over 300 enzymatic reactions, stabilizing our cell’s energy currency, and helping our muscles and nerves relax. Individuals with physiological appropriate levels of magnesium tend to suffer less from conditions such as diabetes, kidney disease, and hypertension. But the benefits do not end there, magnesium may also improve short and long term working memory by improving the density and strength of our nerve network. Luckily, nature has made magnesium ubiquitous and easy to ingest, no matter the eating philosophy, dietary needs, or food selection of even the most finicky eater. Good sources of magnesium are green leafy vegetables, nuts and seeds, dairy, fish, and legumes (magnesium is mostly synonymous with high fiber foods). As easy as finding and ingesting magnesium should be, there are still large swaths of the population that are in deficiency states. Individuals in chronic unmitigated high-stress lifestyles, alcoholics, caffeine abusers, those engaging in long periods of sweating without proper hydration (exercisers), and individuals eating a highly refined “fiber-less” diet are most at risk for a magnesium deficiency.

Inadequate magnesium may also exacerbate the following conditions:

  • Depression- by reducing serotonin levels. Serotonin positively affects almost all of our 40 million brain cells by regulating sleep, mood, sexual desire, appetite, and learning and social behavior.
  • Heart health- low levels of magnesium may lead to heart arrhythmia (irregular heart beat) in combination with calcium.
  • Diabetes- magnesium helps to regulate the effects of blood sugar by improving insulin sensitivity.
  • Osteoporosis- 50-60% of our body’s magnesium (~25 grams total) are found in our bones.

Magnesium recommendations are 310 milligrams for women and 420 milligrams for men. This dose may be increased in times of acute deficiency with one caveat, high doses of magnesium may cause loose and watery stools (which may be the desired effect for those suffering constipation). Upper tolerable levels for daily use are between 800-1200 milligrams for up to three months. Magnesium can interfere with some medications therefore it is imperative that individuals currently taking any medication discuss magnesium dosing with their doctor.

Magnesium is found in powder form, which can easily be mixed into a drink as well as capsules and liquid. Taking 100 milligrams (up to 250 mgs may be well tolerated after a ramp up period) an hour before bed may help to relax muscles and increases the function of GABA receptors (GABA is a calming “inhibitory” neurotransmitter). If the alchemists taught us one thing, it is our interaction with minerals may greatly influence our longevity and health span. As always, have a healthy day.

C Doussett MPH, RDN

Clark’s 101

Magnesium the Magnificent!

By Clark’s Nutrition

Medieval Latin named it “magnesia”, a white lodestone mineral that was highly magnetic and very highly prized by the 15th century alchemists. This group of protoscientists aimed to purify base metals into gold and craft elixirs of mortality, and believed magnesium deposits could be used to craft the mythical “philosopher’s stone”. While unsuccessful in their pursuit, this historically significant movement produced many writings that would eventually be of benefit to geologists, architects, physiologists and biochemists. Today, we know magnesium to be one of the most important, most studied, and most dynamic nutrients in our bodies. As a major mineral, magnesium assists the body in carrying out over 300 enzymatic reactions, stabilizing our cell’s energy currency, and helping our muscles and nerves relax. Individuals with physiological appropriate levels of magnesium tend to suffer less from conditions such as diabetes, kidney disease, and hypertension. But the benefits do not end there, magnesium may also improve short and long term working memory by improving the density and strength of our nerve network. Luckily, nature has made magnesium ubiquitous and easy to ingest, no matter the eating philosophy, dietary needs, or food selection of even the most finicky eater. Good sources of magnesium are green leafy vegetables, nuts and seeds, dairy, fish, and legumes (magnesium is mostly synonymous with high fiber foods). As easy as finding and ingesting magnesium should be, there are still large swaths of the population that are in deficiency states. Individuals in chronic unmitigated high-stress lifestyles, alcoholics, caffeine abusers, those engaging in long periods of sweating without proper hydration (exercisers), and individuals eating a highly refined “fiber-less” diet are most at risk for a magnesium deficiency.

Inadequate magnesium may also exacerbate the following conditions:

  • Depression- by reducing serotonin levels. Serotonin positively affects almost all of our 40 million brain cells by regulating sleep, mood, sexual desire, appetite, and learning and social behavior.
  • Heart health- low levels of magnesium may lead to heart arrhythmia (irregular heart beat) in combination with calcium.
  • Diabetes- magnesium helps to regulate the effects of blood sugar by improving insulin sensitivity.
  • Osteoporosis- 50-60% of our body’s magnesium (~25 grams total) are found in our bones.

Magnesium recommendations are 310 milligrams for women and 420 milligrams for men. This dose may be increased in times of acute deficiency with one caveat, high doses of magnesium may cause loose and watery stools (which may be the desired effect for those suffering constipation). Upper tolerable levels for daily use are between 800-1200 milligrams for up to three months. Magnesium can interfere with some medications therefore it is imperative that individuals currently taking any medication discuss magnesium dosing with their doctor.

Magnesium is found in powder form, which can easily be mixed into a drink as well as capsules and liquid. Taking 100 milligrams (up to 250 mgs may be well tolerated after a ramp up period) an hour before bed may help to relax muscles and increases the function of GABA receptors (GABA is a calming “inhibitory” neurotransmitter). If the alchemists taught us one thing, it is our interaction with minerals may greatly influence our longevity and health span. As always, have a healthy day.

C Doussett MPH, RDN

Ask Clark’s

“What can I do to age well?” – a letter from Jim of Corona

By Clark’s Nutrition  "ask clarks" header

It is best said by Reebok “a body in motion stays in motion”.   Activation of muscle is the most important feature for keeping healthy and abundant muscle tissue on the body. Why is muscle tissue so important? Muscle tissue has some interesting features including providing protein reservoir (amino acids) for synthesis of vital tissue including organs like your liver, heart and kidneys. Furthermore, altered muscle metabolism plays a key role in the genesis and prevention of many common chronic diseases. Disease prevention includes but is not limited to; a reduction in mortality, heart disease-stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes II, bone density loss (osteoporosis), some cancers (breast, colon) and dementia (Alzheimer’s).

As we age, our bodies experience a progressive loss of skeletal muscle and a decrease in physical function, with an inherent risk of disability and a poor quality of life. The age related loss of muscle mass and strength is called sarcopenia. Regular physical activity is one of the main non-pharmaceutical interventions for older people that are needed to help maintain muscle mass, strength, metabolic function and disease prevention. We must also remember that dietary considerations are a must to feed the muscles and for prevention of sarcopenia. Recently, dietary considerations have become a focus for researchers that are studying the preservation of muscle mass loss. A recent study, with 130 individuals with the average age of 80.3, was subjected to dietary supplementations with age appropriate training. Dietary interventions included additional protein (whey) 22 grams, 10 grams of essential amino acids (including 4 grams of Leucine), and 100 i.u. vitamin D. The end result showed 68% of individuals using dietary supplements become non-sarcopenic, while 100% of the placebo group had no reversal of sarcopenia and remained sarcopenic throughout the entire training program. Test results suggested adequate protein (supplied by the diet: having 100% of the RDA for protein) is not sufficient. While it is noted that additional studies have shown whey protein to be beneficial in growth and maintenance of muscle, some studies were inconclusive about whey and sarcopenia. These additional studies combined the use of whey, essential amino acids and vitamin D to augment whey on its own, proving additional amino acids with Leucine is sufficient to elicit growth. The addition of vitamin D stimulates gene expression (cellular growth) as well. Also increases in GH (growth hormone) and IGF-1 (insulin growth factor one) were seen in the supplementation with reduction in C – reactive protein and inflammation from the addition of vitamin D, which additionally provided growth potential.

The use of supplementation and working out has been a staple in the area of athletic performance, now it is time for the elderly to benefit.

Have a health related question?

Send us your question, your first and last name, and the city you live in to: askclarks@clarksnutrition.com

Due to the number of responses, we will only be able to answer published questions.

References:

  1. Health benefits of physical activity in older patients: a review T Vogel, PH Brechat, PM Leprêtre… – … journal of clinical …, 2009
  2. The underappreciated role of muscle in health and disease1,2,3 Robert R Wolfe  2006 American Society for Clinical Nutrition  nutrition.org/content/84/3/475
  3. Mariangela Rondanelli,  Catherine Klersy, Gilles Terracol, Jacopo Talluri,Roberto Maugeri, Davide Guido, Milena A Faliva, Bruno S Solerte,Marisa Fioravanti, Henry Lukaski, and Simone Perna Whey protein, amino acids, and vitamin D supplementation with physical activity increases fat-free mass and strength, functionality, and quality of life and decreases inflammation in sarcopenic elderly Am J Clin Nutr 2016 103: 830-840;First published online February 10, 2016. nutrition.org/content/103/3/830
  4. [Health benefits and demerits of calcium nutrition or supplementation in older people].Shiraki M.Nihon Rinsho. 2015 Oct;73(10):1770-6. Japanes www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26536675
  5. [Effects of calcium and vitamin D supplementations on cardiovascular disease: review article].Guessous I, Bochud M.Rev Med Suisse. 2012 Jul 11;8(348):1458-63. Review. French. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22934474
  6. Higdon, Ph.D., An Evidence-Based Approach to Vitamins and Minerals Thieme New York, NY. Pg 97-107.

 

 

 

Chino’s Hidden Treasure: Clark’s Nutrition

Staff Reports   

Clark’s is open 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day. Stop by for yourselves and experience Clark’s great customer service, knowledgeable staff, and affordable pricing. Visit www.clarksnutrition.com.

Clark’s is open 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day. Stop by for yourselves and experience Clark’s great customer service, knowledgeable staff, and affordable pricing. Visit http://www.clarksnutrition.com.

Chino – Have you ever heard of Clark’s Nutrition? Imagine a Whole Foods, Sprouts, Trader Joes, and Nutrishop all under one roof… in your back yard, Chino! Clark’s Nutrition & Natural Foods Market is a rare find in the natural foods industry. If you haven’t discovered this amazing store yet, it is worth your time to investigate.

Marketing Director, Mike Barnett says, “Often people will tell us that they’ve heard of Clarks and they think it’s just another supplement shop, but once they walk inside our Chino store, they get what all the fuss is about.”

Clark’s stores not only have a huge selection of supplements (their Chino location has one of the largest supplement sections in the entire country), but they have a wide variety of organic grocery items, complete with gluten-free sections,  including Vegan and Vegetarian options, as well as a large selection of organic produce.

Want to get a free make-over with natural, cruelty-free make-up too? No problem, Clark’s has a make-up section that looks like something you’d see at a MAC make-up counter. Clark’s is the only retail partner with actress, Suzanne Somers, to offer her organic cosmetics and skin care line, SUZANNE Organics.

Clark’s is a pioneer in the health food world. They opened the doors of their first location in Riverside in 1972, long before health food became vogue. Today there are stores in Riverside, Loma Linda, Rancho Mirage and now Chino.

But have you ever been to a “health foods” store before and felt overwhelmed or weren’t sure where to start? Have you felt the opposite, like you knew more than the employee? Have no fear, Clark’s knows how refreshing it is to speak with health food store employees that know their stuff and are willing to share their knowledge.

The Clark’s slogan is, “Live better, we can help.”  How does Clark’s actually help people you ask? Clark’s has made their business thrive on helping to educate people about their health. Starkie Sowers, the Director of Education at Clarks says, “We have Nutritional Consultants at Clarks. These employees go through our 5 level in-house training program. It takes about 3 ½ years to get to a Level 5 at Clarks.” Clark’s takes education about health seriously. These knowledgeable (non-commission) Nutritional Consultants are one of the keys to why people love Clarks so much.

Clark’s is a great find for anyone looking to improve their health. They have competitive pricing, knowledgeable staff, a great product selection and a beautiful Chino location close to home.

Discover this Chino treasure located at 12835 Mountain Ave in Chino.

Live Better Health tip

Clarks Header-CMYKPut Up A Resistance (Training) For Bone Health

By C Doussett M.P.H., R.D.N. of Clark’s Nutrition and Natural Foods Market

The oft-forgotten skeleton is one of our most powerful allies in the quest for health and a long life. Our skeletons not only keep us upright, but they protect vital organs, link body systems to each other and produce our oxygen carrying red blood cells and the majority of our immune cells. They also do wonderful things like nourish us when our diets are lacking and provide the basis for the pH balance in our blood. Taking care of our skeleton requires an adequate mineral and protein supply, as well as important fat soluble vitamins, specifically vitamins D and K. In addition, our skeletons require that we remain physically active and challenge ourselves in a way that sends vital neuro and hormonal signals to maintain bone integrity. Even a modest amount of exercise will have some benefit, yet the majority of individuals with sound bone health adhere to a well thought out and consistent exercise program. This means not only engaging in “cardio” (running, swimming, and biking) but resistance exercise, colloquially known as “hitting the weights”.

Weight training allows bones to experience what is known as the minimal essential strain (MES). The MES is a specific force that induces positive changes in skeletal health and is generally calculated at one/tenth the strain it would take to fracture a bone. In other words, weight training places a healthy strain on our bones that signals those same bones to strengthen themselves. The effects of resistance training on bone health can be felt after only a few sessions and regular training can ensure bones are healthy for years to come.

Knowing this, we must ask, who is at risk for impaired bone integrity?

  • Individuals with small skeletal structures, this unfortunately means a majority of women, including smokers and alcoholics
  • Soda drinkers- due to the high phosphorous content and caffeine, also known to block calcium absorption, or simply because soda is replacing milk and fortified orange juice as the beverage of choice
  • Everyone after a certain age as hormones decline.

What problems does impaired bone health (a.k.a. osteopenia and in advanced cases, osteoporosis) present?

  • Increased risk of fractures and breaks, especially hip fractures which can also lead to pressure sores and blood clots which may lead to pulmonary embolisms
  • Pain when exercising and performing activities of a physical nature
  • Weakened muscles and decreased quality of life

There are important activities we can do to strengthen our bones at an early age so they carry us through life. The recommendations for both kids and adults are, not surprisingly, very similar:

  • Get plenty of exercise. Playing like a kid is a great way to send signals to the bones to keep them strong, resistance training as well as an aerobics class, yoga or a walking group
  • Get your calcium. Leafy green vegetables and bone/mineral broths. For those individuals eschewing dairy, calcium fortified grains, salmon in the can with the bones, and fermented soy products are great, as well as dried spices like thyme, oregano, and basil (up to 100 milligrams of calcium per three tablespoons)

Major fractures later in life can cause immune system compromise and leave us susceptible to opportunistic infections. Keep your skeleton young and your body will follow suit, and as always, have a healthy day.

Ask Clark’s

                                                                  "ask clarks" header

By Clark’s Nutrition and Natural Foods Market

Q: “What is gluten and is it bad for me?” – a letter from Melisssa of Loma Linda

A: Gluten is a protein found primarily in wheat, rye, triticale and barley. A smaller protein found in gluten which is called gliadin is a “simple cereal protein” that can be problematic for some individuals as well. As for gluten being bad for you? This depends on whether or not you are gluten intolerant or gluten sensitive. Individuals that are gluten sensitive or allergic may have moderate to severe reactions when consuming gluten. People with Celiac disease (called Celiac Sprue originally) are often the most concerned with gluten. Celiac, once considered to be rare is being better diagnosed which is leading to a larger numbers of individuals being identified as gluten intolerant. Celiac individuals are considered to be DNA-gene susceptible for gluten intolerance. Often identified early in life, Celiac is also diagnosed later in adolescence as well. Celiac individuals who consume gluten respond with an immune (T-cell) reaction to gluten. This effect causes lesions on the intestinal lining and malabsorption, preventing nutrients from getting into the body, and is often accompanied by pain and diarrhea. Prevalence of Celiac disease is about 1 in every 1000-3000 individuals. Other gluten complications exist as well. Gluten is also a commonly known allergen to the U.S. population. There are also non-Celiac gluten sensitive (NCGS) Individuals. These people have allergy response gluten sensitivity. Symptoms of digestive complications such as gas, bloating and diarrhea along with general symptoms often overlap and make it difficult to distinguish between Celiac and non-Celiac conditions.

The avoidance of wheat is becoming a little on the ‘vogue’ side lately as well. One thing to remember about wheat is that it is considered to be a great source of nutrients. Although wheat is not native to the Western Hemisphere more than 1/3 of the world’s population utilize wheat as a main dietary staple. Some individuals suggest that a lot of the wheat berries in use today in the US have gone through decades of selective changes, and that older wheat like spelt are much easier to digest. This would also include the gluten protein in them. Although considered to be an allergen alternative by some people, it is not for all. If you are sensitive to wheat, consider other grains such as amaranth and quinoa as an alternative. This would allow you to make sure you are getting the full range of nutrients that your body needs.

Have a health related question?

Send us your question, your first and last name, and the city you live in to: askclarks@clarksnutrition.com

Due to the number of responses, we will only be able to answer published questions.

 

Reference

  1. McCane Understanding Pathophysiology 4th ed., Mosby St Louis, MO, 2008 pg 992-4, 1144,
  2. Micheal Murray ND, Encyclopedia of Healing Foods, Atria Books New York, NY. 2005 , pg 333-64
  3. Micheal Murray N.D., The Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine 3rd ed., Atra New York, NY. 2012 Pg 402-6

Chino’s Hidden Treasure: Clark’s Nutrition

Staff Reports   

Chino – Have you ever heard of Clark’s Nutrition? Imagine a Whole Foods, Sprouts, Trader Joes, and Nutrishop all under one roof… in your back yard, Chino! Clark’s Nutrition & Natural Foods Market is a rare find in the natural foods industry. If you haven’t discovered this amazing store yet, it is worth your time to investigate.

Marketing Director, Mike Barnett says, “Often people will tell us that they’ve heard of Clarks and they think it’s just another supplement shop, but once they walk inside our Chino store, they get what all the fuss is about.”

Clark’s stores not only have a huge selection of supplements (their Chino location has one of the largest supplement sections in the entire country), but they have a wide variety of organic grocery items, complete with gluten-free sections,  including Vegan and Vegetarian options, as well as a large selection of organic produce.

Want to get a free make-over with natural, cruelty-free make-up too? No problem, Clark’s has a make-up section that looks like something you’d see at a MAC make-up counter. Clark’s is the only retail partner with actress, Suzanne Somers, to offer her organic cosmetics and skin care line, SUZANNE Organics.

Clark’s is a pioneer in the health food world. They opened the doors of their first location in Riverside in 1972, long before health food became vogue. Today there are stores in Riverside, Loma Linda, Rancho Mirage and now Chino.

But have you ever been to a “health foods” store before and felt overwhelmed or weren’t sure where to start? Have you felt the opposite, like you knew more than the employee? Have no fear, Clark’s knows how refreshing it is to speak with health food store employees that know their stuff and are willing to share their knowledge.

The Clark’s slogan is, “Live better, we can help.”  How does Clark’s actually help people you ask? Clark’s has made their business thrive on helping to educate people about their health. Starkie Sowers, the Director of Education at Clarks says, “We have Nutritional Consultants at Clarks. These employees go through our 5 level in-house training program. It takes about 3 ½ years to get to a Level 5 at Clarks.” Clark’s takes education about health seriously. These knowledgeable (non-commission) Nutritional Consultants are one of the keys to why people love Clarks so much.

Clark’s is a great find for anyone looking to improve their health. They have competitive pricing, knowledgeable staff, a great product selection and a beautiful Chino location close to home.

Discover this Chino treasure located at 12835 Mountain Ave in Chino.

Give The Ferris A Day Off!

Clarks-Header-WEB

Courtesy of C. Doussett MPH, RDN of Clark’s Nutrition

For many people, dieting is like being on a Ferris wheel, there are high and lows and at the start, it’s nothing but promises and anticipation. Yet too often the process is predictably circular and ends up back where it started. For others, dieting is like a carousel ride, dizzy circles mixed with a steady stream of anecdotes and gimmicks, which ultimately creates a plethora of predatory marketing mixed with well-intentioned “advices”. And yet for others, dieting is akin to riding an escalator between two floors, floor one is eat less and floor two is exercise more. Over time, these individuals become stuck in the middle and have to continually eat even less and exercise even more. This is a recipe for long-term failure, but not a failure of a person’s will but one of design.

So what is to be done? There has to be a better way (there is), it has to be easy to understand (not at first but eventually), and easy to implement (this is where it gets tricky). The trick to lasting and meaningful long-term weight loss in the pursuit of health and longevity is highly individual, subject to change, requires study (to both increase health literacy and to guard against sensationalism), and demands constant vigilance. I wish articles like these could offer the “perfect” advice for weight loss, but that would negate the fact that we are dynamic beings who age, deal with stress, experience profound change, and are subject to a genetic code that is at the mercy of our choices, which are at the mercy of our environment.

Yet it is imperative that some reasoned attempt to distill nutritional and lifestyle approaches into a consumable article be made. In that spirit, the following suggestions are given as a starting template for your consideration.

  • Hydrate: water and herbal teas are best. Drink when thirsty and drink extra when urine starts to darken. Both caffeinated sodas and alcohol can negatively influence hydrations status so consume as little as possible.
  • Sleep 7 to 9 hours nightly. Our body’s internal clock can be thrown out of balance in as little as four days of halved sleep (3.5 to 4.5 hours nightly). This may result in mood changes, difficulty learning or remembering, blood sugar imbalance which increases cravings, and difficulty in performing normal activities of daily living (ADLs).
  • Exercise: One hour daily apart from physical activity. Planned vigorous exercise is the hero to the villain we call disease.
  • Plan meals in this order: vegetables, protein, fatty fruits, fruits, legumes, nuts/seeds, and spices. Create an environment where these food choices are everywhere and your body will respond.
  • Seek purpose and avoid risky behaviors

Supplements may be a beneficial way to assist efforts at achieving or maintaining a healthy weight but they are not the strategy per se. Always seek the advice of health professionals and weigh your decisions carefully. For example, caffeine is by far the most popular choice to help an individual with cravings and to give much needed stimulation during calorie deficits and training sessions but for many people, caffeine has side effects that may derail weight loss efforts. If caffeine (at or around 200 mgs per dose) causes anxiety, hypoglycemia, severe jitteriness, insomnia, or loss of appetite it should be minimized or discontinued.

Keep in mind that our best life may be lived at twenty pounds above our prettiest weight, it happens, yet remain vigilant that a cheat day does not become a cheat decade. Lastly, those healthy actions we do once become easier to do twice, do those a thousand times and you have a habit, five thousand times is a skill, ten thousand is a profession, and any more than that is a life well lived. Ha

Ask Clark’s

“I have heard a lot about Resveratrol. What is it and what is it good for?”

A letter from Lisa of Chino Hills  "ask clarks" header

Resveratrol is a defense mechanism or organism produced by plants to prevent infections on the plant such as fungus. The main source of Resveratrol is grapes used to make wine and Japanese Knot weed. Varieties of grapes are called Labrusca and Muscatine a typically the most abundant in Resveratrol. Resveratrol is produced in the grape plant’s vines, roots, seeds, and stalks, but the skin of the grapes is the most abundant source of resveratrol.  Resveratrol is much more abundant in red wines because both the seeds and skins are used.  Conversely, white wines are prepared mainly from the juice.  It is noted that red wines vary considerably in Resveratrol content depending on length of time the skins are present during the fermentation process and climatic areas. Non-fermented grape juice has lower concentrations of resveratrol. Smaller amounts can be found in mulberries, peanuts and eucalyptus as well.

The popularity of Resveratrol developed primarily because of its benefits with cardiovascular support. Known actions of resveratrol include, but are not limited to: antioxidant, inhabitation of cholesterol synthesis, inhibition of atherosclerosis, reduced inflammation and promotion of vaseodialatioin. Human and animal studies indicate possible benefits of Resveratrol including reduced risk in certain types of cancers and heart disease. Although a lot of these studies are not double blind studies and they have no definitive conclusions, researchers are positive about the strong outcomes and positive benefits of resveratrol research that is currently taking place.

The benefits of Resveratrol have been seen using a supplemental form as well. Dietary supplements can obtain resveratrol from the Japanese knotweed plant (Polygonium cuspidatum) as well as grapes. Many individuals like the supplemental form the best because of the disadvantages of wine consumption. Although one to two glasses of wine a day (5-6 oz) are considered to be healthy for adults, many end up drinking more than what is ‘healthy’, making wine a possible deterrent when not consumed properly. While alcohol consumption for resveratrol is not always optimal, supplemental forms have shown benefits. There are many studies for supplemental forms with positive results. It is noted these are preliminary studies and some are vitro (test tube) studies and more conclusive studies are on the horizon. Consumption of resveratrol from foods and supplements has shown great health benefits. It is always a good reminder to note that resveratrol is a colorful compound. Foods that have color also have healthy benefits. Remember to eat fresh fruits and vegetables for color and health benefits.

Have a health related question?

Send us your question, your first and last name, and the city you live in to: askclarks@clarksnutrition.com

Due to the number of responses, we will only be able to answer published questions.

What Is A Superfood?

Courtesy of Michael Clarks-Header-WEBBarnett of Clarks Nutriton  

Superfood is “a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being, increasing health and vitality,” according to the Oxford Dictionary. With this definition it might be possible that a lot of foods are Superfoods. The reason for the ‘super’ foods label is because of the benefits some foods provided                                                                              to health.

For example, cod liver oil is considered to be a super food. During the mid-1900’s cod liver oil was used to support immunity, joint, and cardiovascular disorders.  Cod liver oil is abundant in vitamins A & D and high in Omega-3, an essential fatty acid.   Cod liver oil is an example of a nutrient rich food that might provide benefits for individuals not consuming these nutrients, ultimately filling a gap in diet.

  • Vitamin A is essential for cell and bone growth, and eye function. According to the World Health Organization (W.H.O.), vitamin A has proven to be beneficial in the prevention of infectious diseases such as Measles in developing countries.
  • Vitamin D also plays a significant role in supporting healthy immune function.
  • Omega-3 fatty acids not only help regulate inflammation and aid in cardiovascular health, they also play a significant role in maintaining proper brain function, as well as several other critical functions in the human body.

One of the more popular Superfoods currently is “greens.” Green powders come in all varieties, but are mainly comprised of fruit and vegetable extracts.  Fruits and vegetables are rich in nutrients including vitamins and minerals.  More importantly, fruits and vegetables have an array of color. Often times color is attributed to phytonutrients, which are pigments that provide health benefits as well.  An example of a phytonutrient can be seen in lycopene.

Lycopene is the pigment that makes tomatoes and watermelon red. Lycopene acts as an antioxidant in the skin and aids in protecting against breast and prostate cancers.  Because of its lycopene dense nature, tomatoes can be considered a Superfood. Most fruits and vegetables have great protective factors for your health.

Having a diet rich in whole foods is the best approach to getting today’s Superfoods. Whole foods include fruits and vegetables (not pealed or skinned), whole unrefined grains, nuts, seeds, beans-legumes, lean grass fed beef, free range hen eggs, chicken, and fish.

Try to avoid processed foods and simple refined sugars and high saturated fat diets. Those individuals with plant based diets rich in Superfoods tend to be less susceptible to disease.  So you may consider making plant based diets the focus.

Have a health related question?

Send us your question, your first and last name, and city you live in to: askclarks@clarksnutrition.com

Due to the number of responses, we will only be able to answer published questions.

Suzanne Somers Coming To Clarks In Rancho Mirage!

Staff Reports

 

Rancho Mirage– This Monday, June 6, at noon, Suzanne Somers will be at Clark’s Nutrition in Rancho Mirage! The 69-year-old actress, author, and entrepreneur is coming to Clark’s to speak on toxic-free living; based on her latest book, “Tox-Sick (from toxic to not sick)”.

In conjunction with her appearance, Clark’s will be launching her toxic-free home cleaning supplies in their retail locations.

In 2014, Suzanne was at Clarks to launch her SUZANNE Organics, toxic-free, gluten free, cosmetics and skincare collection. Her cosmetics and skin care line has been a huge success. In fact, Clark’s created what looks like a MAC make-up counter, with free makeovers, in all their locations.

Clark’s Marketing Director, Mike Barnett says, “Suzanne is such a great advocate for health. She has helped women realize that the make-up they put on their face goes into their body with her cosmetic line. Now, she is helping all of us see how to get toxins out of our home with her book and home cleaning products.” Somers book, “Tox-Sick (from toxic to not sick)” will also be available in paperback for the first time at Clarks on Monday.

Suzanne says she chose Clark’s Nutrition to be the exclusive retailer for her cutting edge alternative to chemical based products, because, “Our messages are the same. The partnership with Clark’s is a perfect fit.”

Somers, a Clark’s customer for years in their Rancho Mirage location says, “I met with Ray Clark, the CEO, a true visionary, and I felt his devotion and passion for healthy living. It was a slam-dunk to work with Clarks.”

Barnett says, “This is not some paid endorsement, but a partnership between Suzanne and Clarks to carry a shared vision of helping people live healthier, or as we say at Clarks, ‘Live Better…We Can Help’.”

On Monday June 6, all SUZANNE Organic products will be 20% off.