Tag Archives: leaff

What It Means To Be A Police Officer

By LEAFF (Law Enforcement and Fire Fighters)

Photo Courtesy: LEAFF of Eastvale

Photo Courtesy: LEAFF of Eastvale

Eastvale – Have you ever heard the saying, “If you want to be loved, be a firefighter; and if you want to be hated, be a cop?”  It seems that in today’s world and with recent cases in the news – including the brutal execution of two New York Police Officers – this has never been more true. However, let us take the time to really think about what it takes to be a Police Officer and reflect on that this year.

In 2014, 113 police officers were killed in the line of duty. These courageous men and women will never see their families, friends, or co-workers again and all for the service of others. While there may be “bad apples” in the bunch, the facts are that there are far more “good” cops that go to work each day and work vigilantly to uphold the law.

Representatives like Officer Stacy from Alabama, who caught a women stealing from a grocery store to feed her kids because she was short 50 cents to buy a dozen eggs. Instead of arresting her, he went back into the store and bought her a carton of eggs. Later, he brought her two truckloads of food. These stories don’t always get told.

What about Hamburg Officer, Joe Bloom, who helped a family with a disabled child get her medicine during the terrible storms on the East Coast?  Or Officer Briggs, who talked a man out of jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge.

Police Officers do much more than arrest criminals, write tickets and patrol the streets. Often, they go above and beyond to keep your family safe and to help those that others may walk by.

On behalf of all citizens, THANK YOU to our Law Enforcement Officers who go out and do the right thing each day. We appreciate what you do.

In 2015, take the time to be thankful for all the good Police Officers out there who deserve your respect and admiration.

Eastvale: What It Means To Be A Police Officer

By LEAFF (Law Enforcement and Fire Fighters)

 

leaff-logo            Eastvale – Have you ever heard the saying, “If you want to be loved, be a firefighter; and if you want to be hated, be a cop?”  It seems that in today’s world and with recent cases in the news – including the brutal execution of two New York Police Officers – this has never been more true. However, let us take the time to really think about what it takes to be a Police Officer and reflect on that this year.

In 2014, 113 police officers were killed in the line of duty. These courageous men and women will never see their families, friends, or co-workers again and all for the service of others. While there may be “bad apples” in the bunch, the facts are that there are far more “good” cops that go to work each day and work vigilantly to uphold the law.

Representatives like Officer Stacy from Alabama, who caught a women stealing from a grocery store to feed her kids because she was short 50 cents to buy a dozen eggs. Instead of arresting her, he went back into the store and bought her a carton of eggs. Later, he brought her two truckloads of food. These stories don’t always get told.

What about Hamburg Officer, Joe Bloom, who helped a family with a disabled child get her medicine during the terrible storms on the East Coast?  Or Officer Briggs, who talked a man out of jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge.

Police Officers do much more than arrest criminals, write tickets and patrol the streets. Often, they go above and beyond to keep your family safe and to help those that others may walk by.

On behalf of all citizens, THANK YOU to our Law Enforcement Officers who go out and do the right thing each day. We appreciate what you do.

In 2015, take the time to be thankful for all the good Police Officers out there who deserve your respect and admiration.

 

Eastvale: Plaques Honoring Deputies Unveiled

By LEAFF (Law Enforcement And Fire Fighters)

Eastvale – Eastvale’s WOLFF (Wives of Law Enforcement and Firefighters) dedicated memorial plaques at American Heroes Park to honor Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Investigator, Alcides “Al” Rivera, and Lt. Patrick Libertone.

alicides-rivera-memorialRivera, 55, died June 16 after suffering complications from shoulder surgery. He had been with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department for 31 years, 23 of those years with the Narcotics Bureau.

patrick-libertone-memorialLibertone was also a 31 year veteran of the Sheriff’s Department, and worked in the Fraud and Cyber Crimes Bureau. On August 12, he made a traffic stop on a reckless driver who had cut him off, and suffered a fatal heart attack.

According to WOLFF, these men, who both lived in Eastvale, dedicated their lives to public safety and served their communities proudly, helping to maintain law and order, protect members of the public, prevent crimes, and improve the quality of life for all citizens.

The ceremony was held at American Heroes Park located at 6608 Hellman Ave., in Eastvale, on October 25. JCSD’s Directors, Jane Anderson and Chad Blais, welcomed the crowd. Reflections by Family and Friends were presented by Mayor Ike Bootsma, and the plaques were unveiled with a closing statement by an LASD Department representative.

 

Eastvale: Stay Cool This Summer

By LEAFF (Law Enforcement and Fire Fighters)

 

LEAFF Law Enforcement and Fire Protection

L.E.A.F.F. Eastvale

Eastvale – With all the heat and humidity that we are experiencing this summer – not to mention the drought conditions that make us look forward to rain and cooler weather – LEAFF recommends that you use these Tips for Staying Safe in the Heat:

1. Make sure to keep hydrated. Lots of water and fluids are crucial when playing or working outside. If your children are in sports they should be drinking water consistently- ALL DAY- even before their activity begins.

2. Make sure there is adequate shade for your animals outside or bring them inside, if possible, when the temperatures rise.

3. Make sure animals have fresh, clean water to last all day; and be sure to change their water completely at least every two days to avoid stagnation, which pets tend to avoid.

4. Try to exercise outdoors either early in the morning, or in the evening when it’s cooler.

5. Never leave animals or children inside of a hot vehicle, no matter what!

Eastvale: L.E.A.F.F. Update

leaff-logo
BY L.E.A.F.F.
(LAW ENFORCEMENT AND FIRE FIGHTERS)

Eastvale – May was a busy month for LEAFF, and with summer upon us, things are set to become much busier.

On May 15, we had the privilege to present two exceptional Roosevelt High School seniors with plaques and scholarships to honor their efforts in the Police and Fire Explorer programs. Jacob Martin and Carlos De La Torre both worked really hard in their respective programs and we are excited to hear what their futures will bring for them and the community around us.

This summer also marks the return of Picnic in the Park, which we are very excited about. This is a great way to get out and meet your neighbors and community, and enjoy local food, music, carnival rides and a spectacular fireworks show. Picnic in the Park returns this year June 27 through 29, at the new Eastvale Community Park. We hope to see everyone there!

LEAFF has also given their support to WOLFF (Wives of Law Enforcement and Fire Fighters) for the 88iMPACT 1st Annual iMpact Festival, to be held at the Mid-Hill Golf Club in support of our community, small business development, military, law enforcement and firefighters. The event will feature live entertainment, great food, vendors, and maybe even a few celebrities. It is scheduled for August 2 at 4:00pm. Get your tickets while they last by visiting http://iPactfestival.eventbrite.com.

Don’t Be Shy

leaff-logo1
By L.E.A.F.F. (Law Enforcement and Fire Fighters)

The phone number for the EASTVALE POLICE DEPARTMENT is (951) 776-1099.

Remember: DON’T BE SHY. Your job is simply to report an incident, and law enforcement will take your call seriously and check out the situation. What you see and report may be invaluable and may save lives.

Suspicious activities can refer to incidents, events, individuals or circumstances that seem unusual or out of place. Some common examples of suspicious activities include:

• A stranger loitering in your Eastvale neighborhood or a vehicle cruising the streets repeatedly.
• Someone peering into cars or house windows.
• A high volume of traffic going to and coming from a home on a daily basis.
• Someone loitering around schools, parks or secluded areas.
• Strange odors coming from a house or building.
• Open or broken doors and windows at a closed business or unoccupied residence.
• Someone tampering with electrical, gas or sewer systems without an identifiable company vehicle or uniform.
• Sounds of breaking glass, gunshots, screaming or fighting.
• Strangers removing license plates or loading valuables into vehicles from a residence, even if the moving truck looks legitimate.

Remember: A quick and accurate description of events, vehicles, and persons can make all the difference in apprehending a potential criminal. Any type of activity or circumstance that seems unusual should be reported.

By reporting these types of suspicious activities, Eastvale citizens can help the police make their community safer and more secure, reduce violence, minimize victimization, reduce crime and violence, and improve the overall quality of life.

Eastvale: Fight Crime, One Neighborhood at a Time

Neighborhood Watch

Neighborhood Watch (Photo Courtesy: Bing Images)



BY JENNIFER MADRIGAL

Eastvale – With the recent high “perception” of crime in Eastvale, one way to help resolve it is to get involved. Communities that participate in Neighborhood Watch Programs statistically have less crime than those that do not. The National Crime Prevention Council shows that Neighborhood Watch works because it reduces opportunities for crimes to occur. It doesn’t rely on altering or changing the criminal’s behavior or motivation, but instead relies on a cooperative partnership between neighbors and their Police Departments designed to improve security, reduce crime and combat illegal activity.

Last July, the City of Eastvale, in collaboration with L.E.A.F.F. and the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department, hosted a Neighborhood Watch Kick-off to get the community excited about the program. The program however, has failed to successfully get off the ground. Concerned with the lack of public involvement, the Eastvale Public Safety Commission has been asked by the City Council to ensure that the program gets back up and running again.

At the last Public Safety Commission Meeting in February, Eastvale Police Department’s Captain Danny Feltenberger spoke to the commission and audience about the Neighborhood Watch Program. According to Feltenberger, “The program is about community, not about law enforcement, and it takes a lot to keep it going, a lot of hard work.” He suggested that the commission find people who are active in the community and recruit three chairs to head up the three sections of the city. These people can then appoint block captains who will work in their neighborhoods. Training for block captains is done by the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department, who will send a representative to a meeting to train and prepare residents for their own neighborhood program. The hope is that once this program successfully gets going, block captains can take reports from their individual neighborhoods and report to the chair people who will then report to the Public Safety Commission and City Council. In addition to helping spread information, this “chain of communication” will also help provide a reliable way of conversing in the event of an emergency or disaster.

The City of Eastvale is a community unlike many others in that we have an extremely active social media dynamic. Many crimes have been solved and further investigated because of information shared on Facebook and other social media sites, like the City of Eastvale’s “Persons of interest Page”. The large number of law enforcement and firefighters who are active throughout the community has also helped to raise awareness and deter crime. According to L.E.A.F.F., the nation’s only law enforcement and fire fighter organization, founded in Eastvale, “We are asking that the community come together and participate. We need you all to be the eyes and ears in order to help law enforcement better do their jobs”.

According to Asst. Chief of Police, Michael Yates, at January’s Public Safety Commission Meeting, Eastvale residents have a 100% accuracy rate when identifying and calling in suspected marijuana grow houses as they are aware of the signs. This shows that residents are vigilant and active and those skills are what are needed in Neighborhood Watch block captains and participants.

The Public Safety Commission has been asked to start a subcommittee that will look into ways to help make the Neighborhood Watch program more successful. During February’s Public Safety Commission Meeting, Commission Member, Melonee Cruse, happily stepped forth and agreed to head up the subcommittee. She will now work with other members of the commission, local law enforcement and the community to further this program along.

If you are interested in volunteering to be a Neighborhood Watch Chairperson or a block captain, contact Melonee Cruse at MCruse@EastvaleCA.gov, or contact Deputy Jeff Cryder at (951) 955-9225 or via email at jcryder@riversidesheriff.org.

Tips to Help Prevent a Burglary

LEAFF Law Enforcement and Fire Protection

L.E.A.F.F. Eastvale

By LEAFF

Eastvale – In light of a few residential burglaries that have occurred in the city and the repercussions of AB109, 12 basic steps to prevent your house from being burglarized can be taken.

1. Perform routine tasks and clean up the outside of your property on a regular basis to show you are occupying your home. Empty your mailbox on a regular basis, collect old newspapers from your driveway, and pick up discarded trash that has landed in your yard.

2. Install timed lights or leave a radio or television playing if you are traveling or will be absent from your home for long periods of time. You may want to enlist a trusted friend or neighbor to keep an eye on your property and to collect your mail while you are traveling away from home.

3. Lock all your doors, windows, garages, and sheds when you leave your home to make it difficult for burglars to enter without attracting the attention of others. Test your locks durability by trying to open your doors and windows from the outside. Install sturdy deadbolt locks on your doors to prevent thieves from breaking in easily. If you have double front doors, use bungee cords to connect the door knobs to prevent thieves from kicking the door in. Remove the red knob tied to the string on your garage door track lock. This prevents hooking the knob and unlocking your garage door.

4. Make your doors and windows visible to the neighborhood and to the street. Cut away tree branches or high shrubbery that can hide burglars when they are breaking and entering your home.

5. Store your valuables away from windows or doors where they can easily be seen from the outside. You may want to hang privacy curtains over windows to make it difficult for others to see inside. Close shutters, blinds and pull curtains to prevent thieves from peering into your house.

6. Hide or destroy any outside trash that may advertise your personal belongings to the rest of your neighborhood. For example, you may want to break down or destroy boxes that contained valuable, expensive electronic devices you may have just purchased, such as a large television or stereo system.

7. Leave spare house keys with trusted friends, family, or neighbors instead of placing them outside on your property. Burglars may be familiar with common hiding places for spare keys.

8. Park your vehicles inside a closed garage to make it difficult for burglars to determine if you are home or not.

9. Install a home alarm system to deter burglars and to alarm authorities if there is a break-in. Consult with your home insurance provider to seek discounts for alarm systems. Place home alarm signs in the front yard to alert burglars that your home has an alarm.

10. Stray away from routine schedules to make it more difficult for burglars to predict when you will be absent from your home.

11. Only use fully shielded neighbor-friendly lighting that is equipped with motion or infrared detectors. Don’t create a nuisance or safety hazard with glaring lights that impair vision. Crime Prevention through Environmental Design recommends, “Lighting that does not create glare, light trespass, or deep shadows. Lighting only has potential to act as a deterrent if witnesses are present and can counter-productively attract attention to a target and assist a burglar. FBI statistics demonstrate that the majority of residential break-ins occur during daylight hours.”

12. Alter your outside landscaping to make it difficult for burglars to navigate your property without being seen or heard. You may want to surround your windows or home with loose gravel, stones, or rocks that will make noise when stepped on. Place plants or shrubbery under your windows or on your property that are difficult to navigate around, such as rose bushes with lots of thorns.