Tag Archives: Nutrition

Get ROOTED with Shannon Scheller

Nutritional Therapy Practitioner & HoliRooted Wellness Founder, Shannon Scheller.
Photo Courtesy: MaxLove

Staff Reports

Shannon Scheller is a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner (NTP) and she is the founder of HoliRooted Wellness.  Shannon’s goal as a NTP is to help educate you on the simple changes you can make in your life that will affect the health of you and your family.  She strives to help you reduce your toxic load in daily products and food, as well as restore proper function within your body.  Shannon can help you and your family get ROOTED in a holistic approach to fuel your body for battle and support optimal levels of vitality. 

“I am passionate about empowering others with education about the simple changes you can make to improve cellular function, create a healthy home environment, and help your family thrive!” says Scheller. 

Shannon’s desire to help others started when her daughter was diagnosed with cancer.  “When my daughter was diagnosed 2 years ago, I felt powerless as the Doctors told me there was nothing I could do and that every calorie is a GOOD calorie.  My mommy powers were completely gone until I focused on nutrition and overall wellness,” said Scheller.  “She thrived through treatment due to supporting proper cellular function and reducing toxic load.”  Now, Shannon is happy to report that her daughter is 1 ½ years cancer free! 

After her daughter’s treatment, Shannon completed her education to become a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner, and she continues to stay informed of new research to this day.  She wants to educate and empower others to take their health back.  “Every calorie DOES matter, let me teach you why!” says Scheller.  

Booking a Nutritional Therapy Consultation with Shannon will allow you to receive a health history analysis, a 3-day food and mood journal evaluation, a signs and symptoms analysis and 2 support calls to walk you through this journey.  “Together we map out a plan of lifestyle and dietary recommendations that will support the overall function and health of your body,” said Scheller. 

However, Nutritional Therapy is more than learning how to eat healthy.  “I address your top health concerns by looking into nutritional deficiencies, dysfunction or any imbalance you may have.  You are individually unique even down to your microbiome,” says Scheller. 

Shannon will do a deep investigation into your signs and symptoms to help her understand the healing nutrients you need.  “This will allow us to get to the ROOT cause,” Scheller said. 

“I also love to empower and educate on all things holistic,” added Scheller.  Shannon is passionate about educating on nutrition, essential oils, detoxification methods, and especially how to reduce the toxins within your home.  “These are my driving force!  Let me teach you how to create a life of vitality!” said Scheller.  

Visit www.holirootedwellness.com today to sign up for an amazing deal on a Nutritional Therapy Consultation.  However, on top of that already great deal, Shannon is offering an even BIGGER discount for a limited time only.  Get 30% off when you type in the code ROOTED30. 

Shannon’s website also includes a link to her blog, where you can read the following articles: Healthy Holiday Gift Guide; How to Support Healthy Breast Tissue; and How to Support Someone Whose Child Was Just Diagnosed With Cancer. 

Hoisin-Glazed Meatballs

with Roasted Sweet Potato and Broccolini

By Hello Fresh   

Photo courtesy: Hello Fresh

Photo courtesy: Hello Fresh

We’re big fans of baking, rather than frying, our meatballs for a healthier alternative to this dinnertime staple. But don’t worry, the dish is still jam-packed with flavor thanks to a sweet hoisin glaze, roasted sweet potatoes, and crispy veggies. One bite and you’ll be hooked.

Cooking Time: 30 min.

Servings: 2

Nutrition: Calories: 580 cal, Fat: 22g, Sat. Fat: 7 g, Protein: 35g, Carbs: 64 g, Sugar: 19 g, Sodium: 451 mg, Fiber: 10 g

Ingredients:

  • Ground Beef- 10 oz.
  • Sweet Potatoes- 1
  • Broccolini- 6 oz.
  • Panko Breadcrumbs- ¼ cup
  • Ginger- 1 Thumb
  • Scallions- 2
  • Hoisin Sauce- 2T
  • Lime- 1
  • Sugar- 1t
  • Oil- 1T

Preparation:

  1. Prep: Wash and dry all produce. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Halve the sweet potato lengthwise, then thinly slice into ¼-inch half moons. Peel and mince the ginger. Thinly slice the scallions, then chop until finely minced.
  2. Roast the sweet potatoes: Toss the sweet potatoes on a baking sheet with a drizzle of oil and a pinch of salt and pepper. Place in the oven for about 20 minutes, flipping once, until golden brown.
  3. Make the meatballs: In a medium bowl, combine the ginger, scallions, beef, panko, and 1 teaspoon sugar. Season with salt (we used ¾ teaspoon kosher salt) and pepper. Form into 1-inch meatballs, and place onto one side of a lightly oiled baking sheet.
  4. Roast the broccolini: Place the broccolini on the opposite side of the baking sheet with the meatballs. Toss with a drizzle of oil and a pinch of salt and pepper. Place in the oven for 15 minutes, until tender and slightly crispy.
  5. Glaze the meatballs: After 15 minutes, glaze each meatball with a little hoisin sauce. Remove the broccolini from the baking sheet, then return to the oven for about 5 minutes.
  6. Finish and serve: Cut the lime into wedges. Serve the meatballs with the broccolini and sweet potatoes on the side. Squeeze over a lime wedge and enjoy!

Ask Clark’s

"ask clarks" headerBy Clark’s Nutrition and Natural Foods Market

A Letter from Janice from Palm Desert

Q:I want to use essential fatty acids, but where do I start?”

A: First, I think it is important to understand what essential fatty acids are.

Essential fatty acids are fatty acids that cannot be made by the body and must be obtained from the diet. Essential fats are used by the body to make other substances that control or regulate growth, maintenance and proper function of many physiological processes. Some of the processes essential fatty acids (or EFA’s) help include modulating inflammation, fever, regulating immune responses, and overall cardiovascular health. These manufactured substances are called eicosanoids. These substances are better known as prostaglandins, leukotineines, cytokines and others that regulate inflammatory or anti-inflammatory actions in the body. Eicosanoids are local-acting hormones.  The body makes eicosanoids from fats which include essential fatty acids. The essential fatty acids are called linolenic acid and linoleic acid. Linolenic acids are omega 3 fatty acids while linoleic fatty acids are called omega 6 fatty acids. These are polyunsaturated fats (meaning they are not fully saturated with hydrogen’s, which is one of the chemicals that make up fats). Omega 3 fatty acids and some omega 6 fats seem to have the most prolific effect on reducing the manufacturing of inflammatory substances. Omega 3 fatty acids are also involved in cardiovascular benefits such as reduction in blood triglycerides and blood pressure thus, making omega 3 fats often sought out. The American diet is typically abundant in omega 6 fatty acids, about 10 grams of fats a day, while the diet is typically low and often devoid of omega 3 fatty acids.

Omega 3 and 6 fatty acid food sources have become popular ‘super’ foods today. Omega 6 oils are found in nuts, soy, corn, sunflower, walnuts, peanuts, canola and safflower. Most salad dressings are rich in these omega 6 oils. Foods that are abundant in omega 3 fats include (in ascending order), olive oil, walnut oil, pumpkin, soy oil, canola oil, hemp and flaxseed oil (the highest). Certain fish are abundant in omega 3 fats and are converted into a more active form called EPA and DHA. The American Heart Association recommends two servings of fish a week including salmon, cod and mackerel bringing in the higher amounts of omega 3’s. The intake for omega 3 fats is considered to be adequate at about 2 grams a day for men and 1 gram a day for women. Many authorities suggest approximately 5 grams a day of omega 3 for health benefits. The use of foods is the primary recommendation while supplementation is helpful to achieve our needs. Supplementation should include rich sources of omega 3 fatty acids, GLA a specific omega 6 fats from borage, evening primrose oil or black current oil would be beneficial as well. A combination of fish and flax are good supplements in my opinion.

Have a health related question?

Send us your question along with your first and last name, and city you live in to: askclarks@clarksnutrition.com

Due to the number of responses, we will only be able to answer published questions.

References:

  1. Whitney, Understanding Normal and Clinical Nutrition, Wadsworth 20 Davis Dr. Belmont, CA 2014. pg 150-9
  2. Sardesai, Introduction to Clinical Nutrition , Marcel Dekker Inc. New York, NY. 1998. PG 46-59.
  3. Jones, Textbook of Functional Medicine, Institute for Functional Medicine, Gig Harbor, WA. 2010. Pg. 477-52.

 

Eastvale: Save Some Green On Groceries

BY NICOLE GILLES, RD, CDE, CSR

Nutritionist-Nicole-Gilles

Nicole Gilles, RD, CDE, CSR

Have you noticed the price of groceries rises just as the summer temperatures do? Over the past few months, I have found myself wandering through the produce section at our local grocery store so appalled by the prices that I end up leaving the section with hardly anything in my cart.

As a Registered Dietitian and genuine fan of fresh produce, I would love to fill my cart with it. But just like everyone else, I have a certain amount of “green” to spend on greens. So after a few weekly trips I decided it was time for a change. I tried another store, and another. One store did offer slightly better prices, but still caused a major blowout to my grocery budget.

If you have found yourself in this same dilemma, I have a solution. As the temperature rises, take advantage of it by planting a few fruits and vegetables. Plants like zucchini, summer squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers, melon, and berries love this kind of weather. Whether you have space for a small garden or even just a few pots, these plants require little space and will provide an abundance of fruits and vegetables for the next several months.

Pick up some plants for a few bucks, and watch them save you lots of “green.” The cost of the plants will pay for themselves by your first harvest, and they will continue to produce for months. Another bonus of growing your own produce is getting your family involved. Ask your kids to help you plant, weed, and water, then stand back and be amazed. Odds are your kids will actually want to eat their vegetables at dinner, or even right out of the garden, especially if they had a hand in their care.

Enjoy these colorful, wonderful foods at meals and snacks. Before you know it, you will be getting in your recommended five servings of fruit and vegetables each day just trying to eat up all your food. And if your plants are like ours, they will feed a family of four and still provide more than you can eat. So what do you do with the extras? Share with others, get creative with recipes, or even just wash, cut, and freeze. Freezing the extras is easy and will continue to stretch your grocery budget even after the growing season has passed. But don’t stop then. The colder months are great for lettuce, spinach, broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, and potatoes. There is a great sense of satisfaction in enjoying a meal that you helped produce. Happy eating!

Eastvale: Eat Well, Feel Happy

BY NICOLE GILLES, RD, CDE, CSR

Have you noticed a change in your mood lately? Not feeling as happy and energetic as you used to? Food may be to blame.

Nutritionist-Nicole-Gilles

Nicole Gilles, RD, CDE, CSR

During the winter months, most Americans tend to eat more starch and fat in their diets, which can leave you feeling sleepy and emotionally
unstable. High fat food, like fried food, whole fat dairy products, and fatty meats take lots of time and energy to digest. All this strain on the body may leave you in need of a nap. Large portions of starchy food, like grain products, pasta, potatoes, and sweets will cause a dramatic rise and fall in blood sugar levels. This effect may cause your mood to rise and fall as well, leaving you feeling mad or anxious. Let’s face it. We could all use a little more energy, patience, and emotional stability to help us juggle our busy lives.

So what are we to do? Small changes in the diet may help support an improved and stable mood while providing increased energy levels. Can you believe food can affect your mental health that much? If you need more convincing, try it out for a month and see how you feel. Start by making small changes like avoiding fried food and switching to low fat foods for a week. The next week, continue your previous changes and start cutting back on starchy food. If this leaves you feeling hungry, increase your portions of vegetables and/or snack on one cup of fresh fruit between meals. The decreased fat and starch intake will decrease your body’s energy demands to digest food, leaving more energy for what you want to do. The decreased starch portions and occasional fruit snack will also support level blood sugars, which will support emotional stability. Together, these small changes can make a big difference in your mental health.

Celebrate Mental Health Month this May by making small food changes to feel better by June!

 

If you would like to slim down this spring, look no further than local Eastvale resident, Nicole Gilles.  Nicole is the owner of Happy and Healthy Nutrition and she is dedicated to helping you achieve your health and weight goals.  As a Registered Dietitian, Certified Diabetes Educator, and Certified Specialist in Renal Nutrition, Nicole is qualified to help you learn how to cope with emotional eating and learn to eat for your body’s individual needs.  Happy and Healthy Nutrition members discover when to eat, how to eat, and how to lose weight and keep it off permanently.  What are you waiting for? Start today, for a happy and healthy tomorrow!

Contact Happy and Healthy Nutrition at http://www.HandHnutrition.com, or call (909) 816-0977; and like them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/happyandhealthynutrition.nicolegilles. Virtual Counseling is also available. Check out their ad in the Eastvale Community News May publication for a special discount available to Eastvale News readers.

 

Eat Well, Feel Happy

BY NICOLE GILLES, RD, CDE, CSR

 

Nutritionist Nicole Gilles

Nicole Gilles, RD, CDE, CSR

Have you noticed a change in your mood lately? Not feeling as happy and energetic as you used to? Food may be to blame.During the winter months, most Americans tend to eat more starch and fat in their diets, which can leave you feeling sleepy and emotionally unstable. High fat food, like fried food, whole fat dairy products, and fatty meats take lots of time and energy to digest. All this strain on the body may leave you in need of a nap. Large portions of starchy food, like grain products, pasta, potatoes, and sweets will cause a dramatic rise and fall in blood sugar levels. This effect may cause your mood to rise and fall as well, leaving you feeling mad or anxious. Let’s face it. We could all use a little more energy, patience, and emotional stability to help us juggle our busy lives.So what are we to do? Small changes in the diet may help support an improved and stable mood while providing increased energy levels. Can you believe food can affect your mental health that much? If you need more convincing, try it out for a month and see how you feel. Start by making small changes like avoiding fried food and switching to low fat foods for a week. The next week, continue your previous changes and start cutting back on starchy food. If this leaves you feeling hungry, increase your portions of vegetables and/or snack on one cup of fresh fruit between meals. The decreased fat and starch intake will decrease your body’s energy demands to digest food, leaving more energy for what you want to do. The decreased starch portions and occasional fruit snack will also support level blood sugars, which will support emotional stability. Together, these small changes can make a big difference in your mental health.

Celebrate Mental Health Month this May by making small food changes to feel better by June!

 

If you would like to slim down this spring, look no further than local Eastvale resident, Nicole Gilles.  Nicole is the owner of Happy and Healthy Nutrition and she is dedicated to helping you achieve your health and weight goals.  As a Registered Dietitian, Certified Diabetes Educator, and Certified Specialist in Renal Nutrition, Nicole is qualified to help you learn how to cope with emotional eating and learn to eat for your body’s individual needs.  Happy and Healthy Nutrition members discover when to eat, how to eat, and how to lose weight and keep it off permanently.  What are you waiting for? Start today, for a happy and healthy tomorrow!

Contact Happy and Healthy Nutrition at http://www.HandHnutrition.com, or call (909) 816-0977; and like them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/happyandhealthynutrition.nicolegilles. Virtual Counseling is also available. Check out their ad on this page for a special discount available to Eastvale News readers.

 

Eastvale: Watch Your Sipping To Slim Down For Summer

BY NICOLE GILLES, RD, CDE, CSR

Nutritionist Nicole Gilles

Nicole Gilles, RD, CDE, CSR

If you have taken a stroll through our local Eastvale stores recently, you may have experienced the same dreadful feeling as I have when you see aisles and aisles tiny bathing suits and cute summer clothes. That’s when you realize it’s about time to put those comfy winter clothes away and get your “beach body” ready for summer. If you are looking to sport your best beach body ever, now is the time to start. Begin the process by swapping those warm winter carbs, like pasta and potatoes, for fresh spring carbs, like seasonal fruits and vegetables. But our food intake is only half the battle; we also need to think about what we are drinking. Of course, any beverage with calories cuts into our food calories for the day. This not only includes juice and sodas, but also alcohol. The majority of Americans consume about 1,000 calories a day from their beverage choices, which does not leave much room for food. Choosing zero calorie beverages will not only whittle that waist line, but will also leave more room for food so you can shape up without feeling wiped out. One beverage in particular to watch is alcohol. But isn’t a glass of wine a day recommended for “Heart Health?” If one glass is good, two is better, right?  Wrong. The secret is moderation.  Just three ounces of wine or beer, or one ounce of liquor slows our calorie burning by 30 percent, and is full of empty calories. It takes a mile of walking to burn off each six ounce glass of wine or 12 ounces of beer.  If we want to protect our heart without slowing down our calorie burning, cut out the alcohol and change your focus to food and fitness. Eating five to six servings of fruits and vegetables each day and getting in 30 minutes of moderate exercise will protect our hearts and help us look amazing in those summer clothes. This April, spread the word of National Alcohol Awareness Month and ‘cut the booze to help you lose’ the winter weight and look slimmer for summer. If you would like to slim down this spring, look no further than your local Eastvale Registered Dietitian, Nicole Gilles, RD, CDE, CSR.  Nicole is the owner of Happy and Healthy Nutrition and she is ready to help you achieve your health and weight goals.  Through her program, you will learn how to eat for your body’s individual needs and learn how to deal with emotional eating.  Happy and Healthy Nutrition members learn when to eat, why you eat, and how to eat to lose weight and keep it off for the rest of your life.  What are you waiting for?  Start today, for a happy and healthy tomorrow. Contact Happy and Healthy Nutrition at http://www.HandHnutrition.com, or call (909) 816-0977; and like them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/happyandhealthynutrition.nicolegilles.  Virtual Counseling is also available.  Check out their ad on this page for a special available to Eastvale News readers.

Eastvale: Create a Valentine’s Day to Remember

By Nicole Gilles, RD, CDE, CSR

Have you ever wondered what would really make your Valentine happy? You’ve tried the chaotic restaurant scene in the past, only to leave feeling uncomfortably full, tired, and stressed from the overcrowded restaurant and crazy parking lot.

This Valentine’s Day, show how much you care through actions instead of food. Skip the busy restaurant and store-bought chocolates. Instead, schedule some quality time with those you love. After all, it’s the time we spend together that creates memories, not high fat food and chocolates. If your loved one is feeling stressed, make time to snuggle up on the couch with their favorite movie. Or give them a back massage to relieve stress and aching muscles.

Maybe your Valentine would like a meal prepared for them. Consider making a romantic dinner for two at home with candles and flowers. Preparing meals at home empowers you to choose healthier foods and smaller portions. When you make the effort, your Valentine will feel the love in their heart and not on their hips. After all, food only lasts a second on the lips, but years on the hips.

Has your child already requested Valentine cards to pass out at school? If so, think about pairing the cards with healthier food options like pretzels instead of candy, or even non-food options like stickers or small toys. Providing non-food options will subtly show the next generation how we can celebrate without depending on food. Food should be used to fuel our bodies to keep them healthy and strong, as opposed to making emotional connections to temporarily improve our moods while permanently affecting our health.

The more you separate food from emotions, the happier and healthier you and your family will be. So give the gift of true love this Valentine’s Day and show your emotions through your actions instead of unhealthy food.

If you would like to slim down this spring, look no further than local Eastvale resident, Nicole Gilles. Nicole is the owner of Happy and Healthy Nutrition and she is dedicated to helping you achieve your health and weight goals. As a Registered Dietitian, Certified Diabetes Expert, and Certified Specialist in Renal Nutrition, Nicole is qualified to help you learn how to cope with emotional eating and learn to eat for your body’s individual needs. Happy and Healthy Nutrition members discover when to eat, how to eat, and how to lose weight and keep it off permanently. Start today, for a happy and healthy tomorrow!

Contact Happy and Healthy Nutrition at (909) 816-0977, or http://www.HandHnutrition.com; and like them on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/happyandhealthynutrition.nicolegilles. And see their ad on page XX for a special discount.

Are We Making Food A “Four-Letter Word”?

By K.P. Sander

Eastvale – They say, ‘You Are What You Eat’, but what if I don’t want to be Potassium Bromate? What if Butylated Hydroxyanisol gives me the creeps (after all, “butylated” sounds like “mutilated”)? In today’s world of high technology and instant gratification, have we microwaved ourselves into a toxic nightmare of diseases, obesity and unhappiness? These are questions I’m willing to find the answers to.

The artificial sweeteners, preservatives, dyes and flavor enhancers that have been added to our foods for decades have fattened not only corporate pocket books through prolonged shelf lives and disguising cheaper, sub-standard products, but they have fattened us up as well. They have created maladies in our bodies including Alzheimer’s, cancers, diabetes and heart disease, and have contributed to emotional disorders in our children – even health concerns for our pets. A hundred years ago, when you grew your own food and fast food was a chicken on the run from the chopping block, these diseases were rare, and even non-existent. But with the initiation of processed foods in the second half of the 20th Century, the health of people everywhere has taken a turn for the worse.

And, are the poisons ingested in our bodies the only cause for concern? Is there more social anxiety prevalent because of social media? By involving more people into our lives via technology, are we becoming more anti-social by hiding behind it? Look around you. The majority of people walking around (and yes, even driving around) aren’t paying attention to where they are going because they are completely focused on their phones: texting, Facebooking, Instagramming.

I’m guilty of all of it, but I can’t remember the last time I truly felt full of health and vitality and just plain old GOOD. I wake up to caffeine, drive-thru when I’m rushed, crack open a can of high-fructose corn syrup for energy, and text instead of call. But I, for one, don’t want to find myself looking a heart attack (or worse) right smack in the face, knowing I contributed directly to it. I’m going to educate myself, read more labels, and avoid ingredients I can’t pronounce or know to be toxic. I’m going to buy more organic foods and less processed foods. I’m going to consider an apple and a handful of almonds as “fast food”. And I’m going to contribute to my general well-being by participating in some actual face time with those I love. I’m guessing my fitness routines will be enhanced, my body and mind will feel better, and my relationships will benefit.

I don’t want “food” to become a four-letter word to me, like “sodium nitrite”. I want it to be a source of joy and nourishment. I want to associate food in the ilk of other four-letter words that I used to describe things that contribute to my well being. Words like good, glad, hale, well, wise…and love.

Eastvale: New Year, New You!

Nutritionist Nicole Gilles

Nicole Gilles, RD, CDE, CSR

BY NICOLE GILLES, RD, CDE, CSR

Eastvale – This year, give yourself the gift of a successful New Year’s Resolution. The New Year often comes with a drastic resolution that may be difficult, or even impossible, to obtain. Making unobtainable goals can leave you feeling worse than before the goal was made.

Rather than make an outrageous resolution, why not set yourself up for success? Instead of saying, “This year I am going to lose 50 pounds and I don’t care if I have to starve to do it”, try making smaller, healthier goals that will help you reach your ultimate objective. For example, “My doctor said I need to lose weight, so I will find a local weight loss expert to help me and I will join the Eastvale Walking Group”.

Choosing smaller goals makes the process more manageable and essentially more obtainable than making one large goal. Instead of focusing on the distant goal, focus your time and energy on the present, and how you’re going to reach today’s goal. Try making a schedule of weekly goals that improve your lifestyle habits, like walking three days a week or limiting eating out to just twice a week instead of four times a week. Your goals should be individualized to you and the areas of your life that you are ready to work on. The small lifestyle changes that you make today will add up to a weight and health improvement before you know it.

If you are seeking a true food professional to help make your goals a reality, look no further than Eastvale Registered Dietitian, Nicole Gilles, RD, CDE, CSR. Nicole is the owner of Happy and Healthy Nutrition and she is ready to help you achieve your health and weight goals. Through her program, you will learn how to eat for your body’s individual needs and learn how to deal with emotional eating. Happy and Healthy Nutrition members learn when to eat, why to eat, and how to eat to lose weight and keep it off. Start today, for a happy and healthy tomorrow.
Contact Happy and Healthy Nutrition at http://www.HandHnutrition.com, call them at (909) 816-0977, and like them on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/happyandhealthynutrition.nicolegilles.